Tag Archives: stained

Crucero y cimborrio – Catedral de Santa María de Burgos by neobit

[more for English]
Sobre la intersección de las naves mayor y transversal se levanta el cimborrio del crucero, de cincuenta metros de altura, con doble cuerpo de luces y asombrosa bóveda de estrella calada, que permite el paso de la luz cenital. Lo construyó Juan de Vallejo entre 1540 y 1568 posiblemente inspirado en el anterior que construyeron Juan y Simón de Colonia, terminado hacia 1495 y que se derrumbó en 1539. Aunque fue construido en pleno renacimiento contiene concesiones y recuerdos del gótico tardío, hábilmente armonizados con el perfil gótico de la Catedral. Es todo él un prodigio de escultura, tanto en estatuas exentas como en relieve; más de cien estatuas se distribuyen en todo su ámbito exterior e interior. De él decía Felipe II, absorto en su contemplación , “que más parecía obra de ángeles que de hombres”.
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The dome of the crossing which is about fifty metres high rises up above the intersection of the Great Nave and the Transversal Nave. It has a double body of lights and an amazing pierced stellar vault, which permits the entry of light from above. It was built by Juan de Vallejo between 1540 and 1568 may well have been inspired by an earlier dome built by Juan and Simón de Colonia, which was finished around 1495 and collapsed in 1539. Although it was built in the midst of the Renaissance period, it still makes some concessions to Late Gothic and skilfully blends in with the Gothic profile of the Cathedral. The sculpture-work is awesome, both in terms of free-standing statues and in relief carving; over 100 statues can be seen inside and outside the Cathedral. King Philip II said while rapt in admiration of the building “that it seemed more the work of angels than of men”.

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Escalera Dorada – Catedral de Santa María de Burgos by neobit

Adosada a la pared del hastial norte de la nave del transepto, se levantó entre 1519 y 1522, una escalera para salvar el desnivel existente entre la puerta de Coronería y la nave norte del transepto. Es del tipo de las llamadas imperiales. La obra fue diseñada y realizada por el gran arquitecto Diego de Siloe, que se inspira en el proyecto que hiciera Bramante para el “Cortile del Belvedere” en Roma. El rejero francés Hilario realizó los antepechos en hierro repujado y dorado con minucioso trabajo de medallones.

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Catedral de Santa María de la Sede de Sevilla by neobit

La catedral de Santa María de la Sede de Sevilla, better known as Seville Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Seville (Andalusia, Spain). It is the largest Gothic cathedral and the third-largest church in the world. It is also the largest cathedral in the world, as the two larger churches, the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida and St Peter’s Basilica, are not the seats of bishops.
Seville Cathedral was built to demonstrate the city’s wealth, as it had become a major trading center in the years after the Reconquista in 1248. In July 1401 it was decided to build a new cathedral. According to local oral tradition, the members of the cathedral chapter said: “Hagamos una Iglesia tan hermosa y tan grandiosa que los que la vieren labrada nos tengan por locos” (“Let us build a church so beautiful and so grand that those who see it finished will think we are mad”). Construction began in 1402 and continued until 1506. The clergy of the parish gave half their stipends to pay for architects, artists, stained glass artisans, masons, carvers, craftsman and labourers and other expenses.
Five years after construction ended, in 1511, the dome collapsed and work on the cathedral recommenced. The dome again collapsed in 1888, and work was still being performed on the dome until at least 1903. The 1888 collapse occurred due to an earthquake and resulted in the destruction of “every precious object below” the dome at that time.
The interior has the longest nave of any cathedral in Spain. The central nave rises to a height of 42 meters and is lavishly decorated with a large quantity of gilding. In the main body of the cathedral, the most noticeable features are the great boxlike choir loft, which fills the central portion of the nave, and the vast Gothic retablo of carved scenes from the life of Christ. This altarpiece was the lifetime work of a single craftsman, Pierre Dancart.

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Capilla de la Concepción o Santa Ana – Catedral de Santa María de Burgos by neobit

This Chapel occupies the site of two earlier chapels and a small courtyard; it was built between 1477 and 1488, by the architects Juan and Simón de Colonia, and was paid for by Bishop Luis de Acuña y Osorio. In the wall of the apse there is a lavish altarpiece in the Flemish Gothic style dedicated to St Joaquin and St Anne. This is the work of Gil de Siloe, who put the finishing touches to the main section in 1492; it depicts the Tree of Jesse around the embrace of Joaquin and Anne, the parents of the Virgin Mary. The lateral sections shelter under fine porches, with numerous statues of saints and prophets, Marian scenes, hagiographies and an image of the founder bishop.

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Basílica de Santa Maria del Pi by neobit

Basílica de Santa Maria del Pi is a 14th-century Gothic church in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. It is situated on the Plaça del Pi, in the Barri Gòtic district of the city.
There are unsubsantiated claims that there was an early Christian church on the site in 413. However it is known that in 987 there existed a church outside the city walls and to the west of Barcelona. This was a small Romanesque church dedicated to the Blessed Lady of the Pine Tree (one of the titles of the Virgin Mary). The church was built between 1319 and 1391. The style of the church was Catalan Gothic, with a single nave almost devoid of ornamentation. However in 1936 the church was gutted by a fire and was later restored.
The floor plan of the church comprises a single nave made up of seven rectangular sections, each covered with a vaulted ceiling and with side-chapels placed between the supporting pillars. The interior length of the nave is 54 metres, the width is 16.5 metres and the height is 12.2 metres. The fire of 1936 destroyed the high altar, the altarpiece, the statues, the choir stalls from 1868 and the organ created in 1808 by Johan de Kyburz.
The high altar is made of alabaster and is the work of Joaquim de Ros i de Ramis. It was installed in 1967.
In the presbytery is a statue of Santa Maria del Pi, 3.3 metres high, created in 1973 by sculptor Enric Monjo.
The original Baroque choir stalls dated from 1771 and were designed by Josep Mas i Dordal. In 1868 these were replaced by neo-gothic stalls, which were destroyed in the fire of 1936. In 1986 the previous baroque stalls were re-instated.
The original stained-glass windows have not survived. The oldest of those that exist now date from 1718. Of these, the window depicting the Adoration of the Magi (above the Door of Avemaria) is the work of Antoni Viladomat.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Saló de Cent – Ajuntament de Barcelona by neobit

This hall was meant to be a meeting room for the Council of One Hundred Jurors. It was designed by the master builder Pere Llobet in 1369. A marble tablet located at the far end informs us that King Peter m celebrated his first meeting here with the Council of One Hundred on August 17,1373. Originally a rectangular hall was planned, covered by a flat beamed ceiling, divided by two stone arches. Light filtered in through one huge stained glass rose window and several smaller ones. This magnificent room underwent several reforms in the course of time which modified its original physiognomy, adding some elements or restoring others, as occurred after the bombing in 1842 that caused serious damage. The most recent reform took place in the first years of the 20th century when the gothic seats were constructed and an alabaster altarpiece was designed by Enric Monserdá. It depicts the city coat of arms flanked by two mace-bearers and sculptures of Joan Fiveller, St. Andrew, the Virgin of Mercy, St. Eulalia, the Book of Privileges and Rafael Casanova.
On the walls are sculptures of King James I and St. George, works of Manuel Fuxá. The floor tiles are decorated with symbols of the guilds and with the city coat of arms.
At the far end is the magnificently decorated door to the “Trentenari” (Hall of Thirty).

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Saló de Cent – Ajuntament de Barcelona by neobit

This hall was meant to be a meeting room for the Council of One Hundred Jurors. It was designed by the master builder Pere Llobet in 1369. A marble tablet located at the far end informs us that King Peter m celebrated his first meeting here with the Council of One Hundred on August 17,1373. Originally a rectangular hall was planned, covered by a flat beamed ceiling, divided by two stone arches. Light filtered in through one huge stained glass rose window and several smaller ones. This magnificent room underwent several reforms in the course of time which modified its original physiognomy, adding some elements or restoring others, as occurred after the bombing in 1842 that caused serious damage. The most recent reform took place in the first years of the 20th century when the gothic seats were constructed and an alabaster altarpiece was designed by Enric Monserdá. It depicts the city coat of arms flanked by two mace-bearers and sculptures of Joan Fiveller, St. Andrew, the Virgin of Mercy, St. Eulalia, the Book of Privileges and Rafael Casanova.
On the walls are sculptures of King James I and St. George, works of Manuel Fuxá. The floor tiles are decorated with symbols of the guilds and with the city coat of arms.
At the far end is the magnificently decorated door to the “Trentenari” (Hall of Thirty).

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