Tag Archives: spirituality

Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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El refectorio – Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de P by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.

via http://bit.ly/1CFP69t

Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The monastery certainly wouldn’t be as beautiful and impressive without its park in the courtyard. You won’t find a quieter place in all Barcelona – except for the birds singing in the trees and the gurgling of the Renaissance fountain in the centre of the courtyard you won’t hear a sound.

via http://bit.ly/1f3OG1u

Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The monastery certainly wouldn’t be as beautiful and impressive without its park in the courtyard. You won’t find a quieter place in all Barcelona – except for the birds singing in the trees and the gurgling of the Renaissance fountain in the centre of the courtyard you won’t hear a sound.

via http://bit.ly/1JfAPwR

Sepulcro de Elisenda de Montcada – Monestir de Pedralbes by neobit

Elisenda de Montcada (c. 1292 – 19 June 1364) was a daughter of Pere de Montcada and his wife Elisenda de Pinos. She was Queen consort of Aragon by her marriage.
Elisenda’s great-grandmother was Constance, Lady of Aitona, an illegitimate daughter of Peter II of Aragon, making her and her husband second cousins once removed.
In 1322 Elisenda became the fourth and last wife of James II of Aragon, thirty years her senior. Elisenda became stepmother to James’ ten children by his second marriage to Blanche of Naples. The marriage lasted for only five years before James died in November 1327, they had no children.
In 1326, James and Elisenda had founded the Monastery of Pedralbes. A year after she was widowed, she retired to the monastery of Pedralbes palace immediately. Although she was never a nun, she was endowed with wide powers over the internal workings of the monastery. Elisenda remained there for the rest of her life.
Elisenda died in 1364. Her tomb is an example of Catalan Gothic.
There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

via http://bit.ly/1Tx9fm6

Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The church has a single nave, with rib vaults and a polygonal apse, and houses a Gothic retablo by Jaume Huguet. The façade is characterized by a large rose window.
Inside the church, on the right side next to a presbytery – a choir which is only accessible by the clergy – the tomb of Queen Elisenda is located. There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

via http://bit.ly/1JW8RsL

Monestir de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The church has a single nave, with rib vaults and a polygonal apse, and houses a Gothic retablo by Jaume Huguet. The façade is characterized by a large rose window.
Inside the church, on the right side next to a presbytery – a choir which is only accessible by the clergy – the tomb of Queen Elisenda is located. There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

via http://bit.ly/1D0CEvk

River, wat, temple, pagoda and vintage bridge by pawinee2910

River, wat, temple, pagoda and vintage bridge with sunset sky

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Bangkok highlight view, this point can see many popular place such as River, wat, temple, pagoda an by pawinee2910

Bangkok highlight view, this point can see many popular place such as River, wat, temple, pagoda and vintage bridge

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