Tag Archives: retablo

La iglesia de San Nicolás de Bari de Burgos by neobit

La iglesia de San Nicolás de Bari de Burgos es un templo católico situada al lado del Camino de Santiago, en la calle de Fernán González, en frente de la catedral.
Desde que la Iglesia de San Esteban fue convertida en el museo del Retablo es la sede de la parroquia de San Esteban.
Fue levantada en 1408 sobre otro templo románico. La preside uno de los retablos más impresionantes y monumentales del Arte del Renacimiento Castellano, realizado en el siglo XV en el taller de Simón de Colonia, diseñado por él y realizado por su hijo Francisco. También de gran interés son sus sepulcros góticos, el arco renacentista de María Sáez de Oña y Fernando de Mena y las tablas de la escuela burgalesa del Maestro de San Nicolás.
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Iglesia de San Nicolás de Bari is a Catholic church on Calle de Fernán González in Burgos, Spain, located next to the Camino de Santiago, in front of the cathedral. Since the Church of San Esteban was turned into a museum, it has served as the seat of the parish of San Esteban. The church was built in 1408, replacing another Romanesque temple. It contains notable examples of fifteenth century Castilian Renaissance art by Simón de Colonia and his son Francisco. Also of great interest are the Gothic tombs, and the Renaissance arc by María Sáez de Oña and Fernando de Mena.

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Capilla de la Concepción o Santa Ana – Catedral de Santa María de Burgos by neobit

This Chapel occupies the site of two earlier chapels and a small courtyard; it was built between 1477 and 1488, by the architects Juan and Simón de Colonia, and was paid for by Bishop Luis de Acuña y Osorio. In the wall of the apse there is a lavish altarpiece in the Flemish Gothic style dedicated to St Joaquin and St Anne. This is the work of Gil de Siloe, who put the finishing touches to the main section in 1492; it depicts the Tree of Jesse around the embrace of Joaquin and Anne, the parents of the Virgin Mary. The lateral sections shelter under fine porches, with numerous statues of saints and prophets, Marian scenes, hagiographies and an image of the founder bishop.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

via http://ift.tt/1VhGdaV

Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The church has a single nave, with rib vaults and a polygonal apse, and houses a Gothic retablo by Jaume Huguet. The façade is characterized by a large rose window.
Inside the church, on the right side next to a presbytery – a choir which is only accessible by the clergy – the tomb of Queen Elisenda is located. There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

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Monestir de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The church has a single nave, with rib vaults and a polygonal apse, and houses a Gothic retablo by Jaume Huguet. The façade is characterized by a large rose window.
Inside the church, on the right side next to a presbytery – a choir which is only accessible by the clergy – the tomb of Queen Elisenda is located. There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

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Capilla de la Virgen de la Esperanza- Catedral de León by neobit

Hace pocos años que está presidida por esta imagen de la Virgen de la Esperanza. Es de piedra, esculpida a finales del siglo XIII. Su policromía es posterior. Representa, en realidad, a la Virgen apocalíptica, con el Niño Dios en su vientre, perseguido por el dragón. Pasó en muchas ocasiones a cerrar el árbol de Jesé. Originó, así mismo, el tipo de imágenes llamadas “abrideras”, a modo de tríptico abierto que mostraba el fruto de sus entrañas. Finalmente, era bastante común representarla en el momento de la Anunciación, embarazada también, como creemos que es el caso presente, a juzgar por la filacteria que porta. Es una imagen lograda con gran realismo, muy querida por todos los leoneses.
En las vidrieras hay escenas de la vida de Jesús y de María. Todas ellas sufrieron profunda restauración el siglo pasado. El sepulcro del muro izquierdo pertenece al obispo Diego Ramírez (1344-1354). Expresa la temática funeraria común.
Frente a esta capilla hay un fresco de Nicolás Francés, roto en el siglo XVIII para dar acceso al altar. En el hueco se colocó un lienzo del Ecce Horno, pintado por Neira en 1834. Suponemos que dicho lienzo intentó sustituir al original, en torno al cual se desarrolla toda la escena, que ocurre en el palacio de Pilato, mostrándose en todas las figuras un gran aire cortesano, rayando la caricatura.

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Catedral de León by neobit

The León Cathedral, dedicated to Santa María de la Regla, was declared of Cultural Interest in 1844. It is known as the Pulchra Leonina and is a masterpiece of the Gothic style dominating the mid-13th century, by master architect Enrique. By the late 16th century it was virtually completed.
The main façade has two towers. The southern tower is known as the ‘clock tower’. The interior represents a combination of architecture, painting, sculpture and other arts. The Renaissance retrochoir contains alabaster sculptures and the choir was built by three great artists: Jusquin, Copin of Holland and Juan de Malinas. Particularly noteworthy is the Plateresque screen in the wall behind the sepulchre of King Ordoño.
It has three portals decorated with sculptures situated in the pointed arches between the two towers. The central section has a large rose window. Particularly outstanding is the image of the Virgin Blanca and the Locus Appellatione, where justice was imparted.
Its almost 1,800 square meters of stained glass windows are one of the main touristic attractions of the cathedral. The great majority of them are original, which is a rarity, and date from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century. They are among the world’s finest stained glass works.
In the Main Chapel, there is an altarpiece by Nicolás Francés (15th century) and a silver urn containing the relics of San Froilán, the town’s Saint patron, made by Enrique de Arfe. The 13th- to 15th-century cloister contains singular sculpted details in the capitals, friezes and ledges.
The Cathedral Museum houses a large collection of sacred art. There are almost 1,500 pieces, including 50 Romanesque sculptures of the Virgin, dating from pre-historic times to the 18th century (Neoclassicism) with works by Juan de Juni, Gregorio Fernández, Mateo Cerezo, a triptych of the School of Antwerp, a Mozarabic bible and numerous codices.
The Cathedral is also one of the three most important Cathedrals on The Way of Saint James (El Camino de Santiago). Along with The Burgos Cathedral and the Cathedral in Santiago De Compostela, it is visited a lot and it is a holy worshipping place, and very sacred to the people of its city. It is one of the things that makes Leon so famous, and one of the main stops on the camino.

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