Tag Archives: pyramid

132 sec by ZacharyV

(my first 10 stop ND filter shot…)

Suntec City was designed by Tsao & McKown Architects with emphasis on Chinese geomancy (feng shui). The five buildings and the convention center are arranged so that they look like a left hand when viewed aerially. The Fountain of Wealth appears like a golden ring in the palm of the hand. As the fountain is made of bronze, it is believed that the balance of metal and water paves the way for success.

Suntec City office towers comprise five buildings across Towers One to Five with four 45-storey and one 18-storey tower making up the five office towers at Suntec City. The latter has 28,000 square feet of net lettable floor area on each floor while the 45-storey towers consist of floor plates ranging from 10,000 to 14,000 square feet. In total, there are about 2.3 million square feet of office space. Tower One to Four is 45-storey representing the 4 fingers and Tower 5 is 18-storey representing the thumb.

Suntec City Mall is a shopping centre in Singapore, located within the Marina Centre subzone of the Downtown Core. Opened in 1994 together with initial phases of the Suntec City development, it was the largest shopping centre in Singapore with 888,000 square feet (82,500 m2) of retail space until the opening of VivoCity in 2006. It also offers a club house called the Suntec City Guild House located on the fifth storey.

The Suntec Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Centre was officially opened on 1 November 1994, and was previously known as the Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Centre (SICEC). Its current name was adopted in 2004 as part of a rebranding exercise. The convention centre has a total of 100,000 square metres of space, over multiple levels.

Initially part of the entire Suntec City development, the building is now separately owned by privately held ARA Harmony Fund and managed by ARA Singapore.

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Old and New – Pyramid through the Arc by mpumilia

Wikipedia: Louvre Pyramid

The Louvre Pyramid (Pyramide du Louvre) is a large glass and metal pyramid, surrounded by three smaller pyramids, in the main courtyard (Cour Napoléon) of the Louvre Palace (Palais du Louvre) in Paris. The large pyramid serves as the main entrance to the Louvre Museum. Completed in 1989,[1] it has become a landmark of the city of Paris.

Commissioned by the President of France François Mitterrand in 1984, it was designed by the architect I. M. Pei, who is responsible for the design of the Miho Museum in Japan, the MasterCard Corporate Office Building in Purchase, New York, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum in Cleveland, Place Ville Marie in Montreal, and the National Gallery of Art (East Building) in Washington, D.C. among others. The structure, which was constructed entirely with glass segments, reaches a height of 21.6 metres (about 71 feet); its square base has sides of 35 metres (115 ft). It consists of 603 rhombus-shaped and 70 triangular glass segments.[2]

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Wikipedia: Arc du Triomphe du Carrousel

The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (pronounced: [aʁk də tʁijɔ̃f dy kaʁusɛl]) is a triumphal arch in Paris, located in the Place du Carrousel. It was built between 1806 and 1808 to commemorate Napoleon’s military victories of the previous year. The more famous Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, across from the Champs Élysées, was designed in the same year; it is about twice the size and was not completed until 1836.

Designed by Charles Percier and Pierre François Léonard Fontaine, the arch was built between 1806 and 1808 by the Emperor Napoleon I, on the model of the Arch of Constantine (312 AD) in Rome, as a gateway of the Tuileries Palace, the Imperial residence. The destruction of the Tuileries Palace during the Paris Commune in 1871, allowed an unobstructed view west towards the more famous Arc de Triomphe.

It was originally surmounted by the famous horses of Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Venice, which had been captured in 1798 by Napoleon. In 1815, following the Battle of Waterloo and the Bourbon restoration, France ceded the quadriga to the Austrian empire which had annexed Venice under the terms of the Congress of Vienna. The Austrians immediately returned the statuary to Venice. The horses of Saint Mark were replaced in 1828 by a quadriga sculpted by Baron François Joseph Bosio, depicting Peace riding in a triumphal chariot led by gilded Victories on both sides. The composition commemorates the Restoration of the Bourbons following Napoleon’s downfall.

The Arc du Carrousel inspired the design of Marble Arch, constructed in London between 1826 and 1833.[2]

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The crowd by GiuseppeTorre

The Louvre at sunset, full of tourists. Paris

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Louvre Lightning by PatKofahl

Please click this image. Much better on black!

I. M. Pei’s pyramid in the court of the Louvre Museum has much in common with another famous Paris landmark, the Eiffel Tower. When they were first introduced, the reaction was very mixed, to say the least. Many people thought of the glass structure as blaspheme, an ugly scar on the face of the venerable palace. Now, It’s hard to imagine the museum without Pei’s masterpiece. It takes a deft touch and incredible skill to meld the classic with the contemporary, and in this case, it’s sheer brilliance.

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iron-pyramid by ZacharyV

Lasalle College of the Arts, formerly LASALLE-SIA College of the Arts, is an arts educational institution in Singapore. LASALLE College of the Arts in partnership with Goldsmiths, University of London, provides tertiary arts education. Founded in 1984 by De La Salle educator, Brother Joseph McNally, LASALLE today offers a range of diplomas and degrees in design, fine arts, film, media arts, fashion, dance, music, theatre, art therapy, Asian art histories, and arts management. LASALLE is a non-profit, private educational institution operating autonomously with financial support from the Singapore Ministry of Education.

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