Tag Archives: black forest

St. Blasien Cathedral_1 by Julien-Foto

The Abbey Church, home to the then third largest dome in Europe was consecrated in 1783.

The St. Blasius’ Cathedral was destroyed in a fire in 1874, less than 100 years after its consecration.

200 years after its first consecration, the cathedral underwent a complete restoration and the church obtained the current interior design: the white marble rotunda, in contrast with the dark benches and organ at the end of the monks’ choir.

The perimeter of the dome with a diameter of 36m matches exactly the distance between the floor and the apex of the vault. The 18m high towering columns carry the hemispherical dome (with a radius of 18m), which encircles the inner side of the vault and acts as a sort of inner shell. The chancel also measures 36m (2 x 18m) in total.

This harmony is also mirrored in the external construction of the building: the width of the facade, 50m, matches the height of the main dome.

Towering above the cathedral’s dome is the golden Imperial Orb with its cross acting as a reminder of an age when St. Blasien used to be an imperial abbey.

via http://ift.tt/1N5KIl4

St. Blasien Cathedral_1 by Julien-Foto

The Abbey Church, home to the then third largest dome in Europe was consecrated in 1783.

The St. Blasius’ Cathedral was destroyed in a fire in 1874, less than 100 years after its consecration.

200 years after its first consecration, the cathedral underwent a complete restoration and the church obtained the current interior design: the white marble rotunda, in contrast with the dark benches and organ at the end of the monks’ choir.

The perimeter of the dome with a diameter of 36m matches exactly the distance between the floor and the apex of the vault. The 18m high towering columns carry the hemispherical dome (with a radius of 18m), which encircles the inner side of the vault and acts as a sort of inner shell. The chancel also measures 36m (2 x 18m) in total.

This harmony is also mirrored in the external construction of the building: the width of the facade, 50m, matches the height of the main dome.

Towering above the cathedral’s dome is the golden Imperial Orb with its cross acting as a reminder of an age when St. Blasien used to be an imperial abbey.

via http://ift.tt/1N5KIl4

Parish Church St. Cyril & George by mirosu

The church is dedicated to Saints Cyril and St. George and St. Mary Magdalene.
It is the former provost of the Benedictine monastery of St. Blasien (see one of my previous photos from St. Blasien). The church dates back to 1283 when a small chapel was built, which was extended to the church in 1698.
The building is associated with the Barons of Tiefenstein. The rectory, built as a residential tower in 1266, is said to be the oldest consistently until today inhabited buildings throughout the district of Waldshut.
The Patrozinim of St. Mary Magdalene is celebrated on July 22, or the following Sunday. The church is accessible during the day and to visit, but not during services.
The Ibacher rural women invite on the day of the Assumption on August 15 for herbal ordination with a Mass, herb sale and Hock.
The Ibacher rectory, which is directly attached to the church, is the seat of the parish Ibach, Urberg and Hierbach. They belong to the Catholic Pastoral Care Unit St. Blasien.

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Upper Gate by mirosu

In the photo you can see the Waldshut’s Upper Gate (Oberes Tor), also called the Schaffhauser Tor, the town’s landmark. It is the east town gate and was built on foundations laid down in the 13th century. Until 1864, it served as the town gaol (jail).
I’ve taken this photo from Kaiserstrasse, Waldshut’s main street, today a main shopping pedestrian zone.
The town of Waldshut lies at the edge of the southern Black Forest, right on the Rhine River, along which runs the German-Swiss border.
The Waldshut townsite lies about 2 km west of where the Swiss river Aare empties into the Rhine.
Until 1803, Waldshut belonged to Further Austria (Anterior Austria).

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Black Forest Architecture by mirosu

Old building detail belonging to a rustic guesthouse with a generous pinch of luxury, the Adler located in Southern Black Forest in Häusern. It has been in the hands of the local Zumkeller family for six generations and looks proudly back on more than 400 years of history!!!
Though the hardwood floors creak and the walls are festooned with heirlooms, this hotel isn’t resting on its traditional laurels. Downstairs is a glass-walled spa, which has a clutch of saunas, pools and whirlpools for a post-hike unwind.
The aesthetic is sleek and understated in the recently revamped design rooms, with pine floors, natural wool rugs and brushed wood furnishings bringing the hotel into the 21st-century without losing an ounce of Black Forest soul. The split-level design emphasizes light and space from every angle. My balcony overlooks a domed chapel.
The Adler’s gourmet restaurant is the only one in Germany to have been awarded a Michelin star every year since 1966.
It lives up to the hype. Head chef Florian Zumkeller’s careful sourcing and love of playful combinations shine through in dishes like meltingly tender beef in a wasabi crust with sesame gnocchi and delicate pineapple ravioli filled with poppy-seed mousse.
Do not miss it when you are in southern Black Forest.

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