Tag Archives: spirituality

sunrise in Bagan by puttikornbeum

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Catedral de Santa María de la Sede de Sevilla by neobit

La catedral de Santa María de la Sede de Sevilla, better known as Seville Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Seville (Andalusia, Spain). It is the largest Gothic cathedral and the third-largest church in the world. It is also the largest cathedral in the world, as the two larger churches, the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida and St Peter’s Basilica, are not the seats of bishops.
Seville Cathedral was built to demonstrate the city’s wealth, as it had become a major trading center in the years after the Reconquista in 1248. In July 1401 it was decided to build a new cathedral. According to local oral tradition, the members of the cathedral chapter said: “Hagamos una Iglesia tan hermosa y tan grandiosa que los que la vieren labrada nos tengan por locos” (“Let us build a church so beautiful and so grand that those who see it finished will think we are mad”). Construction began in 1402 and continued until 1506. The clergy of the parish gave half their stipends to pay for architects, artists, stained glass artisans, masons, carvers, craftsman and labourers and other expenses.
Five years after construction ended, in 1511, the dome collapsed and work on the cathedral recommenced. The dome again collapsed in 1888, and work was still being performed on the dome until at least 1903. The 1888 collapse occurred due to an earthquake and resulted in the destruction of “every precious object below” the dome at that time.
The interior has the longest nave of any cathedral in Spain. The central nave rises to a height of 42 meters and is lavishly decorated with a large quantity of gilding. In the main body of the cathedral, the most noticeable features are the great boxlike choir loft, which fills the central portion of the nave, and the vast Gothic retablo of carved scenes from the life of Christ. This altarpiece was the lifetime work of a single craftsman, Pierre Dancart.

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Basílica de Santa Maria del Pi by neobit

Basílica de Santa Maria del Pi is a 14th-century Gothic church in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. It is situated on the Plaça del Pi, in the Barri Gòtic district of the city.
There are unsubsantiated claims that there was an early Christian church on the site in 413. However it is known that in 987 there existed a church outside the city walls and to the west of Barcelona. This was a small Romanesque church dedicated to the Blessed Lady of the Pine Tree (one of the titles of the Virgin Mary). The church was built between 1319 and 1391. The style of the church was Catalan Gothic, with a single nave almost devoid of ornamentation. However in 1936 the church was gutted by a fire and was later restored.
The floor plan of the church comprises a single nave made up of seven rectangular sections, each covered with a vaulted ceiling and with side-chapels placed between the supporting pillars. The interior length of the nave is 54 metres, the width is 16.5 metres and the height is 12.2 metres. The fire of 1936 destroyed the high altar, the altarpiece, the statues, the choir stalls from 1868 and the organ created in 1808 by Johan de Kyburz.
The high altar is made of alabaster and is the work of Joaquim de Ros i de Ramis. It was installed in 1967.
In the presbytery is a statue of Santa Maria del Pi, 3.3 metres high, created in 1973 by sculptor Enric Monjo.
The original Baroque choir stalls dated from 1771 and were designed by Josep Mas i Dordal. In 1868 these were replaced by neo-gothic stalls, which were destroyed in the fire of 1936. In 1986 the previous baroque stalls were re-instated.
The original stained-glass windows have not survived. The oldest of those that exist now date from 1718. Of these, the window depicting the Adoration of the Magi (above the Door of Avemaria) is the work of Antoni Viladomat.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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The candle by GiuseppeTorre

Inside the Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris.
A magic place to visit in the heart of France.
Usually I always correct the very broad perspective, but in this case I loved the feeling of space that the inclined prospect gives it and I preferred do not to fix the falling lines.

BEST in BLACK
My Instagram profile for street, phonephotography
My website giuseppetorre.co.uk

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Basílica de Santa María del Mar by neobit

The first mention of a church of Santa Maria by the sea dates from 998. The construction of the present building was promoted by the canon Bernat Llull, who was appointed Archdean of Santa Maria in 1324. Construction work started on 25 March 1329, when the foundation stone was laid by king Alfonso IV of Aragon (III of Catalonia), as commemorated by a tablet in Latin and Catalan on the façade that faces the Fossar de les Moreres. The architects in charge were Berenguer de Montagut (designer of the building) and Ramon Despuig, and during the construction all the guilds of the Ribera quarter were involved. The walls, the side chapels and the façades were finished by 1350. In 1379 there was a fire that damaged important parts of the works. Finally, on 3 November 1383 the last stone was laid and on 15 August 1384 the church was consecrated. In 1428 an earthquake caused several casualties and destroyed the rose window in the west end. The new window, in the Flamboyant style, was finished by 1459 and one year later the glass was added. The images and the Baroque altar were destroyed in a fire in 1936. The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, adjacent to the apse, was added in the 19th century.
In contrast with the exterior, the interior gives an impression of light and spaciousness. It is of the basilica type, with its three aisles forming a single space with no transepts and no architectural boundary between nave and presbytery. The simple ribbed vault is supported on slender octagonal columns, and abundant daylight streams in through the tall clerestorey windows.
The interior is almost devoid of imagery of the sort to be found in Barcelona’s other large Gothic churches, the cathedral and Santa Maria del Pi, after the fire which occurred in 1936 during anticlerical disturbances. Amongst the most notable of the works destroyed at that time was the Baroque retable by Deodat Casanoves and Salvador Gurri.
Some interesting stained-glass windows have survived from various periods.
The west end with its rose window, showing the proportions of the three aisles
The spacing of the columns is the widest of any Gothic church in Europe—about forty-three feet apart, center to center.
The church has a serious claim to have the slenderest stone built columns in the world.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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