Tag Archives: Pedralbes

Cloister -Monastery of Pedralbes- by joscarati

A partial view of cloister Monatery of Pedralbes – Barcelona.

In the monastery everything was organised around the central space of the cloister; this is why it became a place of transit, personal meditation and contemplation of nature as an image of the divinity. The cloister currently hosts a project that recreates a mediaeval medicinal herb garden, based on the writings preserved in the monastery and treatises containing the medical knowledge of the time.

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Ceiling of Church -Monastery of Pedralbes- by joscarati

Chuch of Monetary of Pedralbes:
The building consists of a single nave with side chapels inserted between buttresses and has a rib-vaulted ceiling. The seven sections of the nave are topped with keystones depicting the joys of the Virgin, with the coronation and the royal coat of arms in the presbytery, and at the opposite end, a representation of the risen Christ showing the stigmata. The typically Catalan Gothic floor layout displays great formal unity and is notable for the three surviving choirs: the choir loft, the lower choir and the central monks’ choir. The choir loft was used by the cloistered nuns and communicates with the dormitory through the Room of the Angel. The lower choir, also reserved for the nuns and separated by a wall and a railing from the church, is still used for daily prayer. The stone choir with pinewood seats in the middle of the church is the one built for the monks who provided the sung accompaniment to the masses

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La cocina – Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery kitchen

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.

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El refectorio – Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de P by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.

via http://bit.ly/1CFP69t

Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The monastery certainly wouldn’t be as beautiful and impressive without its park in the courtyard. You won’t find a quieter place in all Barcelona – except for the birds singing in the trees and the gurgling of the Renaissance fountain in the centre of the courtyard you won’t hear a sound.

via http://bit.ly/1f3OG1u

Reial Monestir de Santa Maria de Pedralbes by neobit

The monastery was founded by King Jaume el Just (James II of Aragon) for his wife Elisenda de Montcada in 1326.
The construction work of the monastery started in March 1326. Queen Elisenda chose its location in the village of Sarrià, which back then was far out of the city of Barcelona. The name “Pedralbes” derives from the Latin Petras Albas (white stones), a white stone is the cornerstone of the apsis. On May 3, 1327 the nuns moved into the monastery.
Since the monastery was built within just one year, it was not influenced by any other architectural styles and is a fine example of particularly homogeneous gothic architecture in Catalonia.
It was not before the 15th century that the third and lowest storey was added to the cloister.
The monastery certainly wouldn’t be as beautiful and impressive without its park in the courtyard. You won’t find a quieter place in all Barcelona – except for the birds singing in the trees and the gurgling of the Renaissance fountain in the centre of the courtyard you won’t hear a sound.

via http://bit.ly/1JfAPwR

Sepulcro de Elisenda de Montcada – Monestir de Pedralbes by neobit

Elisenda de Montcada (c. 1292 – 19 June 1364) was a daughter of Pere de Montcada and his wife Elisenda de Pinos. She was Queen consort of Aragon by her marriage.
Elisenda’s great-grandmother was Constance, Lady of Aitona, an illegitimate daughter of Peter II of Aragon, making her and her husband second cousins once removed.
In 1322 Elisenda became the fourth and last wife of James II of Aragon, thirty years her senior. Elisenda became stepmother to James’ ten children by his second marriage to Blanche of Naples. The marriage lasted for only five years before James died in November 1327, they had no children.
In 1326, James and Elisenda had founded the Monastery of Pedralbes. A year after she was widowed, she retired to the monastery of Pedralbes palace immediately. Although she was never a nun, she was endowed with wide powers over the internal workings of the monastery. Elisenda remained there for the rest of her life.
Elisenda died in 1364. Her tomb is an example of Catalan Gothic.
There is something particular about Queen Elisenda’s tomb: the sarcophagus is double-sided. On the cloister side Elisenda is figured as a mourning widow, on the church side as a queen.

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