Tag Archives: neo-gothic

Casa Amatller – Patio central by neobit

This amazing building, the Casa Amatller by Puig i Cadafalch, a contemporary of Gaudí, which combines the neo-Gothic style with a ridged façade inspired by houses in the Netherlands, is part of the block known as the “mansana de la discòrdia” of Barcelona. The architect worked with some of the finest artists and craftsmen in Barcelona of the modersnista times, headed by the sculptors Eusebi Arnau and Alfons Jujol.
The Casa Amatller, together with the adjacent Casa Batlló, designed by Gaudí, and the Casa Lleó Morera, by Domènech i Montaner, is part of the “mansana de la discòrdia” or block of discord of Barcelona, so-named because it features buildings in sharply contrasting styles. Curiously, none of these houses was newly built; all three of them are refurbishments of already existing buildings, the Casa Amatller being the first. The original building was constructed by Antoni Robert in 1875, and in 1898 the Amatller family commissioned the Catalan architect and politician Josep Puig i Cadafalch (1867-1956) to refurbish the building. The current building dates from his “rose” or modernista period, which includes buildings such as the Casa Macaya and the Casa de les Punxes, the House of Spikes.
The architect based his design on the typical Catalan mansion and incorporated Germanic elements. In the case of the Casa Amatller of Barcelona, the basic layout is the typical urban Gothic dwelling. This means that what is really a block of flats looks like a single palazzo, an impression accentuated by the delicate porticoes on the balconies on the first floor. The Germanic element is the bold ridged cornice, highlighted with ceramic tiles. You can visit the caretaker’s office, which has survived intact and contains one of the finest stained-glass windows of the modernista era.

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Casa Amatller – Atrium by neobit

This amazing building, the Casa Amatller by Puig i Cadafalch, a contemporary of Gaudí, which combines the neo-Gothic style with a ridged façade inspired by houses in the Netherlands, is part of the block known as the “mansana de la discòrdia” of Barcelona. The architect worked with some of the finest artists and craftsmen in Barcelona of the modersnista times, headed by the sculptors Eusebi Arnau and Alfons Jujol.
The Casa Amatller, together with the adjacent Casa Batlló, designed by Gaudí, and the Casa Lleó Morera, by Domènech i Montaner, is part of the “mansana de la discòrdia” or block of discord of Barcelona, so-named because it features buildings in sharply contrasting styles. Curiously, none of these houses was newly built; all three of them are refurbishments of already existing buildings, the Casa Amatller being the first. The original building was constructed by Antoni Robert in 1875, and in 1898 the Amatller family commissioned the Catalan architect and politician Josep Puig i Cadafalch (1867-1956) to refurbish the building. The current building dates from his “rose” or modernista period, which includes buildings such as the Casa Macaya and the Casa de les Punxes, the House of Spikes.
The architect based his design on the typical Catalan mansion and incorporated Germanic elements. In the case of the Casa Amatller of Barcelona, the basic layout is the typical urban Gothic dwelling. This means that what is really a block of flats looks like a single palazzo, an impression accentuated by the delicate porticoes on the balconies on the first floor. The Germanic element is the bold ridged cornice, highlighted with ceramic tiles. You can visit the caretaker’s office, which has survived intact and contains one of the finest stained-glass windows of the modernista era.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

In 1898 Eusebi Güell asked Antoni Gaudí to build a church for the textile model village he had founded on the outskirts of Barcelona in 1890. The architect proposed an ambitious project, and devoted ten years to preliminary studies during which he developed an innovative “stereostatic” model of the church. The first stone was laid in October 1908 but six years later, in October 1914, Gaudí abandoned the works, after the project became economically unviable for the Güells. The church was to have one upper and one lower nave with 40-metre high towers, but only the first part was ever built, and the project has become popularly known as “the crypt” in its honour.
Although never finished, the Güell village church is considered one of Gaudí’s masterpieces because it anticipates many of the structural solutions that the architect applied to the Sagrada Familia. The entrance porch consists of inclined columns and parabolic and hyperbolic vaults, used here for the first time in the history of architecture. This unique geometric form is repeated in the walls of the church, with a star-shaped profile pierced by large windows whose stained glass combines crosses with plant forms. Both walls and porch incorporate ornamental details in trencadis, using natural and religious motifs. In the interior, Gaudí achieved an open-plan space thanks to the use of inclined stone and brick pillars. Set over these columns, the catenary arches and ribs that support the ceiling constitute one of the most spectacular panaromas in the Gaudí universe.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

In 1898 Eusebi Güell asked Antoni Gaudí to build a church for the textile model village he had founded on the outskirts of Barcelona in 1890. The architect proposed an ambitious project, and devoted ten years to preliminary studies during which he developed an innovative “stereostatic” model of the church. The first stone was laid in October 1908 but six years later, in October 1914, Gaudí abandoned the works, after the project became economically unviable for the Güells. The church was to have one upper and one lower nave with 40-metre high towers, but only the first part was ever built, and the project has become popularly known as “the crypt” in its honour.
Although never finished, the Güell village church is considered one of Gaudí’s masterpieces because it anticipates many of the structural solutions that the architect applied to the Sagrada Familia. The entrance porch consists of inclined columns and parabolic and hyperbolic vaults, used here for the first time in the history of architecture. This unique geometric form is repeated in the walls of the church, with a star-shaped profile pierced by large windows whose stained glass combines crosses with plant forms. Both walls and porch incorporate ornamental details in trencadis, using natural and religious motifs. In the interior, Gaudí achieved an open-plan space thanks to the use of inclined stone and brick pillars. Set over these columns, the catenary arches and ribs that support the ceiling constitute one of the most spectacular panaromas in the Gaudí universe.

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Palacio Episcopal de Astorga by neobit

This Modernist building in the neo-Gothic style consists of a castle, church and stately mansion, and houses the Los Caminos museum. Although designed by Gaudí himself in 1887, this monument was completed by the architect Ricardo García Gureta.
In January 1887, Gaudí was called to Astorga by Bishop Joan Baptista Grau i Vallespinós, who had just seen to blaze the episcopal palace. Gaudi was grateful to his countryman. He wrote on Feb. 8, 1887 to express their gratitude and warning him that he was very busy with the Sagrada Família and the Güell house, and that he could not travel to Astorga to finish the home of his wealthy admirer. He sent therefore a questionnaire to find a letter containing information essential to the development of the project. Gaudí took a few months in the project of the new episcopal palace of Astorga. In July 1887 sent by mail and Dr. Grau was quick to send a telegram: “It likes a lot. Congratulations. I wait letter.” The identification between the two Reus men was total in undertaking the adventure. The budget amounted to 150,000 pesetas. Under the concordat, it was paying to the Government of S. M., and therefore was mandatory approval of the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, which was a long pending. The Academy appointed as reporter to the Marquis de Cubas, the architect of La Almudena cathedral in Madrid, who, given their limited technical and artistic taste reprehensible, was clearly not very qualified to understand the technical revolution and the artistic genius of the young architect Gaudí. Thus, the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando brought great difficulties to the project and demanded to Gaudí a number of changes, that unlike much to the architect. However, for friendship with Dr. Grau, Gaudí went ahead and June 24, 1889 was solemnly the first stone. The building is to be a symbiosis of bishop temple and seigniorial castle. Its interior and exterior forms, drawn by Berenguer in the distant release of the Sagrada Família, are incredibly Spanish at all and, in turn, beyond any of the typical fickle when Spanish architecture lapses or degenerates; the result is a precise and exquisite intimate knowledge of the soul of Spain who had the Catalan Gaudí. During the summer and autumn of 1889, it was made the basement. It is a single stay, a gigantic cave of impressive beauty, heightened by the darkness that invades. The following year, 1890, it was built the ground floor. Its most characteristic element is the triple arc of the entry, which was personally assembled by Gaudí. Between 1891 and 1893, Gaudí took the main floor. This plant so wonderful is that Gaudí properly understood as a “palace or the residence of the bishop” for his friend Dr. Grau. The decor is very nice and the key and essential piece is the chapel. This has exquisite proportions and a delicate execution, which invites the sensitive soul to pray. In the outer towers, Gaudí recorded the coats of Mons. Grau i Vallespinós. The architect was traveling frequently to Astorga, where he was badly received by the forces of the small town, but very well received by Dr. Grau. They criticized Gaudi for having two managers and the architect was defended: -I do like the opera manager who had two tenors in the company and asked him why he did: to the other sings. On September 18, 1893, Dr. Grau died and this led to the interruption of the works. Gaudí resigned on November 4, 1893, and to leave expelled by the Chapter and by public opinion, the Catalan architect said the following sentence prophetic, which was settled by the case: “They will be unable to finish it and capable of leaving interrupted.” Indeed, the Chapter sought new professionals, who could not overcome the enormous difficulty of making the architectural elements half build with the encouragement coming out of the hands of Gaudí, and also failed to understand what he had done technically and filled to continue. Thus, when removing a wall, the vaults collapsed, which was used to disclose to the four winds that Gaudí was an incompetent. The works were suspended indefinitely. Many years later, it was ended up with a decent deck, but not very Gaudí. The building houses since 1962 the Museum of Roads.

via http://bit.ly/1evc4or

Palacio Episcopal de Astorga by neobit

This Modernist building in the neo-Gothic style consists of a castle, church and stately mansion, and houses the Los Caminos museum. Although designed by Gaudí himself in 1887, this monument was completed by the architect Ricardo García Gureta.
In January 1887, Gaudí was called to Astorga by Bishop Joan Baptista Grau i Vallespinós, who had just seen to blaze the episcopal palace. Gaudi was grateful to his countryman. He wrote on Feb. 8, 1887 to express their gratitude and warning him that he was very busy with the Sagrada Família and the Güell house, and that he could not travel to Astorga to finish the home of his wealthy admirer. He sent therefore a questionnaire to find a letter containing information essential to the development of the project. Gaudí took a few months in the project of the new episcopal palace of Astorga. In July 1887 sent by mail and Dr. Grau was quick to send a telegram: “It likes a lot. Congratulations. I wait letter.” The identification between the two Reus men was total in undertaking the adventure. The budget amounted to 150,000 pesetas. Under the concordat, it was paying to the Government of S. M., and therefore was mandatory approval of the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, which was a long pending. The Academy appointed as reporter to the Marquis de Cubas, the architect of La Almudena cathedral in Madrid, who, given their limited technical and artistic taste reprehensible, was clearly not very qualified to understand the technical revolution and the artistic genius of the young architect Gaudí. Thus, the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando brought great difficulties to the project and demanded to Gaudí a number of changes, that unlike much to the architect. However, for friendship with Dr. Grau, Gaudí went ahead and June 24, 1889 was solemnly the first stone. The building is to be a symbiosis of bishop temple and seigniorial castle. Its interior and exterior forms, drawn by Berenguer in the distant release of the Sagrada Família, are incredibly Spanish at all and, in turn, beyond any of the typical fickle when Spanish architecture lapses or degenerates; the result is a precise and exquisite intimate knowledge of the soul of Spain who had the Catalan Gaudí. During the summer and autumn of 1889, it was made the basement. It is a single stay, a gigantic cave of impressive beauty, heightened by the darkness that invades. The following year, 1890, it was built the ground floor. Its most characteristic element is the triple arc of the entry, which was personally assembled by Gaudí. Between 1891 and 1893, Gaudí took the main floor. This plant so wonderful is that Gaudí properly understood as a “palace or the residence of the bishop” for his friend Dr. Grau. The decor is very nice and the key and essential piece is the chapel. This has exquisite proportions and a delicate execution, which invites the sensitive soul to pray. In the outer towers, Gaudí recorded the coats of Mons. Grau i Vallespinós. The architect was traveling frequently to Astorga, where he was badly received by the forces of the small town, but very well received by Dr. Grau. They criticized Gaudi for having two managers and the architect was defended: -I do like the opera manager who had two tenors in the company and asked him why he did: to the other sings. On September 18, 1893, Dr. Grau died and this led to the interruption of the works. Gaudí resigned on November 4, 1893, and to leave expelled by the Chapter and by public opinion, the Catalan architect said the following sentence prophetic, which was settled by the case: “They will be unable to finish it and capable of leaving interrupted.” Indeed, the Chapter sought new professionals, who could not overcome the enormous difficulty of making the architectural elements half build with the encouragement coming out of the hands of Gaudí, and also failed to understand what he had done technically and filled to continue. Thus, when removing a wall, the vaults collapsed, which was used to disclose to the four winds that Gaudí was an incompetent. The works were suspended indefinitely. Many years later, it was ended up with a decent deck, but not very Gaudí. The building houses since 1962 the Museum of Roads.

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