Tag Archives: library

THOMAS JEFFERSON BUILDING by mabel65

The LIBRARY OF CONGRESS is the nation’s first established cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with millions of items including books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.

The oldest of the three United States LIBRARY OF CONGRESS buildings, the THOMAS JEFFERSON BUILDING, was built between 1890 and 1897. It was originally known as the Library of Congress Building. The Beaux-Arts style building is known for its classicizing facade and elaborately decorated interior. Its design and construction has a tortuous history; the building’s main architect was Paul J. Pelz, initially in partnership with John L. Smithmeyer, and succeeded by Edward Pearce Casey during the last few years of construction.

The Jefferson Building was the first separate Library of Congress Building, and was suggested by Librarian of Congress Ainsworth Rand Spofford in 1871, authorized in 1886, and completed in 1897. When its doors were opened to the public on November 1, 1897, it represented an unparalleled national achievement: its 23-carat gold-plated dome capped the “largest, costliest, and safest” library building in the world. Its elaborately decorated facade and interior, for which more than forty American painters and sculptors could surpass European libraries in grandeur and devotion to classical culture. A contemporary guidebook boasted: “America is justly proud of this gorgeous and palatial monument to its National sympathy and appreciation of Literature, Science, and Art. It has been designed and executed entirely by American art and American labor (and is) a fitting tribute for the great thoughts of generations past, present, and to be.” This new national Temple of the Arts immediately met with overwhelming approval from the American public.

Known as the Library of Congress (or Main) Building until it was named for Thomas Jefferson, the Library’s principal founder, in 1980, the structure was built specifically to serve as the American national library, and its architecture and decoration express and enhance that purpose. A national library for the United States was the dream and goal of Librarian Spofford; the new building was a crucial step in his achievement. It was a functional, state-of-the-art structure as well as a Temple of the Arts, using the latest technology throughout.

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Geisel Library, UCSD by tom_coelho

The Geisel Library building is named in honor of Audrey and Theodor Seuss Geisel (better known as Dr. Seuss) for the generous contributions they have made to the library and their devotion to improving literacy. The Geisels were long-time residents of La Jolla, where UC San Diego is located.

The building is featured in the UC San Diego logo and is the most recognizable building on campus. It is located in the center of the campus with Library Walk to its south, Thurgood Marshall College to its west, and Earl Warren College to its east.

The library first opened in 1970. It was simply called the Central Library until a renovation was completed in 1993, when it was rededicated as the University Library Building. It was renamed Geisel Library in 1995

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Watch your step , part 2 by bjcowles

A few days ago I posted “watch your step ” , this a capture from the bottom of the stairs looking up. It shows all of the large blue mobile and the unique library skylight . These are not the main stairs but another way to the top floor . This library is a wonder place to visit and if like me , to find exciting things too capture .

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The Library Of Congress (VI) by michaelwilhelmi

The Library Of Congress is the reference library for the USA’s Congress. It has the world’s largest collection of books, 35 million volumes in over 650 miles (1050 km) of bookshelves.

This image is a second look at the ‘Great Hall’ of the building. This is the last one from this series, thanks to all for viewing, reviewing and commenting!

This link points directly to information about the Great Hall:
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The Library Of Congress (V) by michaelwilhelmi

The Library Of Congress is the reference library for the USA’s Congress. It has the world’s largest collection of books, 35 million volumes in over 650 miles (1050 km) of bookshelves.
This is a ceiling area from the ‘Great Hall’ of the building. It features, among other things, paintings of two women. On the left is a painting labeled ‘Tradition’ on the right one labeled ‘Erotica’. I have to wonder about that label!

A big thanks to Markus Sholz for providing a link to an online tour of the building:
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The Library Of Congress (IV) by michaelwilhelmi

The Library Of Congress is the reference library for the USA’s Congress. It has the world’s largest collection of books, 35 million volumes in over 650 miles (1050 km) of bookshelves.

This is another of the ceilings of one of the ten reading rooms of the library. These reading rooms are not all currently used for reading but some are used for exhibits. For example, one is used to display US President Thomas Jefferson’s collection of books which was offered by him to the Library of Congress to form the basis of the current library.

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The Library Of Congress (III) by michaelwilhelmi

The Library Of Congress is the reference library for the USA’s Congress. It has the world’s largest collection of books, 35 million volumes in over 650 miles (1050 km) of bookshelves.
The Library has been housed since 1897 in a Italian Renaissance-style building near the US Capitol in Washington, D.C.
This image is of the ceiling and its bordering area of one of the ten reading rooms of the library. This one is decorated with a painting labeled ‘Conquest’ and the names of conquerors, explorers and artists from the past.

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Hadrian’s Library by vasiliosgavrilis

Hadrian’s Library was created by Roman Emperor Hadrian in AD 132 on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens.
The building followed a typical Roman Forum architectural style, having only one entrance with a propylon of Corinthian order, a high surrounding wall with protruding niches (oikoi, exedrae) at its long sides, an inner courtyard surrounded by columns and a decorative oblong pool in the middle. The library was on the eastern side where rolls of papyrus “books” were kept. Adjoining halls were used as reading rooms, and the corners served as lecture halls.

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