Tag Archives: IFTTT

Saunders steps in to face Ellenberger in Utica

After an injury forced Bryan Barberena from his June 1 bout against welterweight veteran Jake Ellenberger, another longtime 170-pound standout has stepped in to face “The Juggernaut,” as Ben “Killa B” Saunders will now stand across the Octagon from Ellenberger at Adirondack Bank Center in Utica, New York.Headlining the event, which airs live on FS1, is a clash of bantamweight contenders between Jimmie Rivera and Marlon Moraes. Tickets go on sale on April 6.A member of the UFC roster since 2009, Ellenberger has fought the best of the best at 170 pounds, including Carlos Condit, Robbie Lawler, J … Read the Full Article Here

from UFC News After an injury forced Bryan Barberena from his June 1 bout against welterweight veteran Jake Ellenberger, another longtime 170-pound standout has stepped in to face “The Juggernaut,” as Ben “Killa B” Saunders will now stand across the Octagon from Ellenberger at Adirondack Bank Center in Utica, New York.Headlining the event, which airs live on FS1, is a clash of bantamweight contenders between Jimmie Rivera and Marlon Moraes. Tickets go on sale on April 6.A member of the UFC roster since 2009, Ellenberger has fought the best of the best at 170 pounds, including Carlos Condit, Robbie Lawler, J … Read the Full Article Here
via https://ift.tt/2uxjTqJ

Governance Remains ​a ​Key Imperative ​as Blockchain Evolves

This is the final piece in a five-part series on the business impact of blockchain technology.

To wrap up blockchain week, BRINK had a conversation with Joanna Hubbard, CEO of Electron, a London-based blockchain startup, about the role of government in blockchain, the opportunities it presents for new business models to flourish, and the risks associated with the technology. This Q&A has been edited for length and clarity.

BRINK: How has blockchain continued the trend toward decentralized power sources, which was already underway even before blockchain appeared on the scene?

Joanna Hubbard: I don’t think blockchain is changing decentralization—the cat was out of the bag already. I think what it’s doing, or what it’s capable of doing, is creating a new coordinating architecture that allows you to actually engage really small assets as a kind of safe central course. You can essentially coordinate all of your trading interests on the platform so that everyone trusts that they’re going to get from the market what they want from the market. I think what blockchain will enable us to develop is that kind of market trustee. You bring enough equality and different types of assets and products into a market, and you essentially trust the really diverse set of assets and the set of requirements designed to help balance the kind of increasingly intermittent overall system.

BRINK: What’s the role of government in the energy sector as it relates to blockchain?

Hubbard: I’m going to be really unpopular in saying this, but I think blockchain is a fantastic source of governance. I think that government will be involved in setting the essential basic rules and parameters of the systems and evolving those rules. A lot of the rules are going to be around data validity: what kind of license do you need to be paid at, what data sets can you see, how much of a system can you interact with? I think governments are going to be key in answering those questions.

Because energy is a local market product, different governments and different regions are going to have different rules. These different programs on the system create a kind of transparency of who’s going to be expected to trade and on what basis—and that gives rise to a business world with a much more efficient market structure.

You can mitigate a lot of the classic risks around hacking through running a consortium blockchain with visibility, transparency and data.

BRINK: But doesn’t blockchain bypass the role of government, as it were? Does government still need to play a role in this?

Hubbard: Absolutely, in the end it does. If we’re talking about consortium blockchains, that means that you have to be commissioned to participate, and even then you have to be commissioned under full sanctions. So governments are creating rules around, for example, how much price risk the customer can be exposed to. So if someone wants to change their trade, they might not want to turn their electric power off and find that they got charged 1,000 pounds for half an hour of electricity. They need protection, and that will be a role specific to government and built in to the trading consortium blockchain.

BRINK: Right. But wouldn’t they need to be in the business of owning energy sources?

Hubbard: No. And I really think they shouldn’t be in the business of owning energy sources. I don’t think that’s how you get an efficient market outcome.

BRINK: What sorts of new businesses do you think will emerge in the next five to 10 years as a result of blockchain?

Hubbard: Partly data-driven businesses, partly distributed energy resources (DER) aggregation businesses and also shift energy businesses. For example, a company is already looking at providing batteries for electric vehicles based on the fact that they can then trade those batteries within the vehicle, which takes away the worry of vehicle owners that the battery will be degraded too fast. It also enables someone to essentially aggregate massive amounts of flexible kinds of distributor loads. I also think the aggregator model has been really under-scaled recently. Who will provide people with services that manage all their utilities, trade those utilities for them and guarantee the price for them? Basically we should expect to see business models that require much more granular information and more open market access that we don’t have today.

BRINK: You’ve clearly gone into this business because you see this as a huge opportunity. But what are the kind of risks involved in shifting to a blockchain-oriented economy?

Hubbard: I think you can mitigate a lot of the classic risks around hacking through running a consortium blockchain with visibility, transparency and data. A consortium blockchain is less likely to be hacked than a public blockchain because you have to have permission to engage on that blockchain. And even if that node was taken over, the other nodes would be able to identify that the node was hacked into and cut it off the system. And you would be able to reverse that stream before it was hacked into. So that would reduce some of those risks that are most common.

from Brink – The Edge of Risk https://ift.tt/2pSq6YC
via IFTTT

Governance Remains ​a ​Key Imperative ​as Blockchain Evolves

This is the final piece in a five-part series on the business impact of blockchain technology.

To wrap up blockchain week, BRINK had a conversation with Joanna Hubbard, CEO of Electron, a London-based blockchain startup, about the role of government in blockchain, the opportunities it presents for new business models to flourish, and the risks associated with the technology. This Q&A has been edited for length and clarity.

BRINK: How has blockchain continued the trend toward decentralized power sources, which was already underway even before blockchain appeared on the scene?

Joanna Hubbard: I don’t think blockchain is changing decentralization—the cat was out of the bag already. I think what it’s doing, or what it’s capable of doing, is creating a new coordinating architecture that allows you to actually engage really small assets as a kind of safe central course. You can essentially coordinate all of your trading interests on the platform so that everyone trusts that they’re going to get from the market what they want from the market. I think what blockchain will enable us to develop is that kind of market trustee. You bring enough equality and different types of assets and products into a market, and you essentially trust the really diverse set of assets and the set of requirements designed to help balance the kind of increasingly intermittent overall system.

BRINK: What’s the role of government in the energy sector as it relates to blockchain?

Hubbard: I’m going to be really unpopular in saying this, but I think blockchain is a fantastic source of governance. I think that government will be involved in setting the essential basic rules and parameters of the systems and evolving those rules. A lot of the rules are going to be around data validity: what kind of license do you need to be paid at, what data sets can you see, how much of a system can you interact with? I think governments are going to be key in answering those questions.

Because energy is a local market product, different governments and different regions are going to have different rules. These different programs on the system create a kind of transparency of who’s going to be expected to trade and on what basis—and that gives rise to a business world with a much more efficient market structure.

You can mitigate a lot of the classic risks around hacking through running a consortium blockchain with visibility, transparency and data.

BRINK: But doesn’t blockchain bypass the role of government, as it were? Does government still need to play a role in this?

Hubbard: Absolutely, in the end it does. If we’re talking about consortium blockchains, that means that you have to be commissioned to participate, and even then you have to be commissioned under full sanctions. So governments are creating rules around, for example, how much price risk the customer can be exposed to. So if someone wants to change their trade, they might not want to turn their electric power off and find that they got charged 1,000 pounds for half an hour of electricity. They need protection, and that will be a role specific to government and built in to the trading consortium blockchain.

BRINK: Right. But wouldn’t they need to be in the business of owning energy sources?

Hubbard: No. And I really think they shouldn’t be in the business of owning energy sources. I don’t think that’s how you get an efficient market outcome.

BRINK: What sorts of new businesses do you think will emerge in the next five to 10 years as a result of blockchain?

Hubbard: Partly data-driven businesses, partly distributed energy resources (DER) aggregation businesses and also shift energy businesses. For example, a company is already looking at providing batteries for electric vehicles based on the fact that they can then trade those batteries within the vehicle, which takes away the worry of vehicle owners that the battery will be degraded too fast. It also enables someone to essentially aggregate massive amounts of flexible kinds of distributor loads. I also think the aggregator model has been really under-scaled recently. Who will provide people with services that manage all their utilities, trade those utilities for them and guarantee the price for them? Basically we should expect to see business models that require much more granular information and more open market access that we don’t have today.

BRINK: You’ve clearly gone into this business because you see this as a huge opportunity. But what are the kind of risks involved in shifting to a blockchain-oriented economy?

Hubbard: I think you can mitigate a lot of the classic risks around hacking through running a consortium blockchain with visibility, transparency and data. A consortium blockchain is less likely to be hacked than a public blockchain because you have to have permission to engage on that blockchain. And even if that node was taken over, the other nodes would be able to identify that the node was hacked into and cut it off the system. And you would be able to reverse that stream before it was hacked into. So that would reduce some of those risks that are most common.

from Brink – The Edge of Risk https://ift.tt/2pSq6YC
via IFTTT

Generations of Apprenticeship Power Career Success

Body: 

Electrical apprenticeships have launched careers for three generations of this Georgia family.

Following in the footsteps of her electrician father, Betsy Ritch-Reed put on a hard hat and tool belt, and began an apprenticeship with the Independent Electrical Contractors (IEC) in the early 1980s.

As part of her on-the-job training, she assisted with specialized projects for the military in a pre-fabrication shop at Fort Benning, Georgia. After completing the Independent Electrical Contractors apprenticeship program, she worked as a licensed electrician for 11 years. In 1996, she took over her father’s business, Ritch Electric Co. Inc., in Columbus, Georgia. Today she oversees more than two dozen employees.

Betsy Ritch-Reed
      Betsy Ritch-Reed

Betsy has helped train the next generation of electricians as an instructor at Columbus Technical College and as a substitute instructor for the IEC apprenticeship program. She continues to hire and train electrical apprentices for her own business, as well.

Her advice to the next generation: Stick to your goals. “Whatever career you choose, do not let anyone tell you that you can’t do it,” said Betsy. “If you believe you can do it, you can.”

Her 22-year-old grandson, Blaine Reed, has followed in the family footsteps and has nearly finished the four-year IEC apprenticeship. The program involves paid on-the-job training under the supervision of an IEC contractor, as well as 576 hours of classroom instruction learning about topics such as residential wiring, electrical theory, how to interpret the National Electric Code, and grounding and electrical design. Upon completion, graduates are certified as an electrician by the IEC and can apply their trade throughout the country.

Betsy’s success has been a model for Blaine, who has seen how the electrical trade can provide a fulfilling career and a good living.

“Societies need great electricians to build a connected and lighted world,” said Blaine, who likes working with robots. Like his grandmother, he is taking on-the-job training at Fort Benning. One day he also would like to own his own business – one that focuses on programmable logic controllers, which are specialized computers used to control robots and other kinds of electromechanical systems or processes.

The outlook for electricians is bright, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which projects the occupation will grow 9 percent between 2016 and 2026. The IEC estimates there is a shortage of nearly 100,000 electrical workers across the country. Learn more about how to become an electrician via the BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Eric R. Lucero is a deputy director in the department’s Office of Public Affairs in Atlanta, Georgia.

Authors: 

from U.S. Department of Labor Blog

Body: 

Electrical apprenticeships have launched careers for three generations of this Georgia family.

Following in the footsteps of her electrician father, Betsy Ritch-Reed put on a hard hat and tool belt, and began an apprenticeship with the Independent Electrical Contractors (IEC) in the early 1980s.

As part of her on-the-job training, she assisted with specialized projects for the military in a pre-fabrication shop at Fort Benning, Georgia. After completing the Independent Electrical Contractors apprenticeship program, she worked as a licensed electrician for 11 years. In 1996, she took over her father’s business, Ritch Electric Co. Inc., in Columbus, Georgia. Today she oversees more than two dozen employees.

Betsy Ritch-Reed
      Betsy Ritch-Reed

Betsy has helped train the next generation of electricians as an instructor at Columbus Technical College and as a substitute instructor for the IEC apprenticeship program. She continues to hire and train electrical apprentices for her own business, as well.

Her advice to the next generation: Stick to your goals. “Whatever career you choose, do not let anyone tell you that you can’t do it,” said Betsy. “If you believe you can do it, you can.”

Her 22-year-old grandson, Blaine Reed, has followed in the family footsteps and has nearly finished the four-year IEC apprenticeship. The program involves paid on-the-job training under the supervision of an IEC contractor, as well as 576 hours of classroom instruction learning about topics such as residential wiring, electrical theory, how to interpret the National Electric Code, and grounding and electrical design. Upon completion, graduates are certified as an electrician by the IEC and can apply their trade throughout the country.

Betsy’s success has been a model for Blaine, who has seen how the electrical trade can provide a fulfilling career and a good living.

“Societies need great electricians to build a connected and lighted world,” said Blaine, who likes working with robots. Like his grandmother, he is taking on-the-job training at Fort Benning. One day he also would like to own his own business – one that focuses on programmable logic controllers, which are specialized computers used to control robots and other kinds of electromechanical systems or processes.

The outlook for electricians is bright, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which projects the occupation will grow 9 percent between 2016 and 2026. The IEC estimates there is a shortage of nearly 100,000 electrical workers across the country. Learn more about how to become an electrician via the BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Eric R. Lucero is a deputy director in the department’s Office of Public Affairs in Atlanta, Georgia.

Authors: 

via https://ift.tt/2Ifajec

Till headlines at home against Thompson in May

On May 27, the UFC’s first visit to Liverpool, England will feature a hometown hero, as No. 7-ranked welterweight contender Darren Till will put his unbeaten record on the line against two-time world title challenger Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson at Echo Arena.Tickets for UFC Fight Night, which airs live on FS1, go on sale on April 13.Fresh from a spectacular 2017 campaign in which he defeated Jessin Ayari, Bojan Velickovic and Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone, the 25-year-old Till has crashed the welterweight top ten and now he’s hungry for more, starting with his bout against the No. 1-ranked Thompson … Read the Full Article Here

from UFC News On May 27, the UFC’s first visit to Liverpool, England will feature a hometown hero, as No. 7-ranked welterweight contender Darren Till will put his unbeaten record on the line against two-time world title challenger Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson at Echo Arena.Tickets for UFC Fight Night, which airs live on FS1, go on sale on April 13.Fresh from a spectacular 2017 campaign in which he defeated Jessin Ayari, Bojan Velickovic and Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone, the 25-year-old Till has crashed the welterweight top ten and now he’s hungry for more, starting with his bout against the No. 1-ranked Thompson … Read the Full Article Here
via http://bit.ly/2Gm7gQV

Aubin-Mercier recovered & ready after second camp in two months

Olivier Aubin-Mercier celebrates after his submission victory over Drew Dober during UFC 206. (Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC)” align=”center” />
If anyone is a prime candidate for the “making lemonade out of lemons” foundation, it’s Olivier Aubin-Mercier, who switched gears smoothly after seeing his February bout against Gilbert Burns scrapped on fight week when it was deemed unsafe for Burns to continue cutting weight for the lightweight matchup.“I took maybe a week off after the Burns incident,” he said. “I went to Disney World, went to Universal and af … Read the Full Article Here

from UFC News Olivier Aubin-Mercier celebrates after his submission victory over Drew Dober during UFC 206. (Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC)” align=”center” />
If anyone is a prime candidate for the “making lemonade out of lemons” foundation, it’s Olivier Aubin-Mercier, who switched gears smoothly after seeing his February bout against Gilbert Burns scrapped on fight week when it was deemed unsafe for Burns to continue cutting weight for the lightweight matchup.“I took maybe a week off after the Burns incident,” he said. “I went to Disney World, went to Universal and af … Read the Full Article Here
via http://bit.ly/2pPcvCe

Unfiltered: Chris Gethard Taps Matt Serra (Kinda)

Comedian, actor, and writer, Chris Gethard, joins Jim and Matt in-studio for the whole show and bonds with Matt over X-Men and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and talks about getting started in comedy, The Chris Gethard Show, John Danaher, Renzo Gracie, falling in love with MMA through PRIDE, and much more. Plus, the guys break down Tony Ferguson vs. Kevin Lee after a fan tries to correct Matt on Instagram, Chris puts Matt in a rear-naked choke, and the biggest soda-spill in Unfiltered history goes down at the top of the show.

Full Episode

Chris on training BJJ at Renzo Gracie Academy

Chri … Read the Full Article Here

from UFC News Comedian, actor, and writer, Chris Gethard, joins Jim and Matt in-studio for the whole show and bonds with Matt over X-Men and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and talks about getting started in comedy, The Chris Gethard Show, John Danaher, Renzo Gracie, falling in love with MMA through PRIDE, and much more. Plus, the guys break down Tony Ferguson vs. Kevin Lee after a fan tries to correct Matt on Instagram, Chris puts Matt in a rear-naked choke, and the biggest soda-spill in Unfiltered history goes down at the top of the show.

Full Episode

Chris on training BJJ at Renzo Gracie Academy

Chri … Read the Full Article Here
via http://bit.ly/2GpLpIo

Vote now in Final 4 for Greatest Fight of All Time

In honor of March Madness, the UFC has put together a tournament of its own featuring a bracket filled with the 25 Greatest Fights of All Time. Fans have voted and let their voices be heard. After some close battles the Final 4 is set and voting has opened on Twitter to see which two classic fights will battle for the title of Greatest of All Time. In the first matchup, No. 1-seed Nate Diaz vs Conor McGregor 2 from UFC 202 takes on No. 4-seed Robbie Lawler vs Rory MacDonald 2 from UFC 189. In the second matchup, No. 7-seed Jon Jones vs Alexander Gustaffson from UFC 165 is up against No. 14-s … Read the Full Article Here

from UFC News In honor of March Madness, the UFC has put together a tournament of its own featuring a bracket filled with the 25 Greatest Fights of All Time. Fans have voted and let their voices be heard. After some close battles the Final 4 is set and voting has opened on Twitter to see which two classic fights will battle for the title of Greatest of All Time. In the first matchup, No. 1-seed Nate Diaz vs Conor McGregor 2 from UFC 202 takes on No. 4-seed Robbie Lawler vs Rory MacDonald 2 from UFC 189. In the second matchup, No. 7-seed Jon Jones vs Alexander Gustaffson from UFC 165 is up against No. 14-s … Read the Full Article Here
via http://bit.ly/2pOVA2R