Tag Archives: frank lloyd wright

Up The Down Staircase by Meezer3

In 1871, the Great Fire ravaged Chicago. While devastating, it launched a building boom that pushed architectural experimentation and advancement that put Chicago at the forefront of progress. The Rookery was one of the resulting masterpieces of commercial architecture.

Prior to the Great Fire, this site was known as the “reservoir lot,” housing the water works for the south side of the Loop. The structure had a large central water tank of solid masonry that survived the conflagration. This structure was converted to Chicago’s first public library. The top of the tank was made into a skylight, and bookshelves lined the round walls. City Hall also occupied this site.

In 1885, City Hall moved from here to a new site, and wealthy Boston brothers Peter and Shepherd Brooks leased a city-owned lot on the southeast corner of Adams and LaSalle Streets. With Chicagoan Owen Aldis, they formed the Central Safety Deposit Company and hired architects Burnham & Root to design a prestigious office building. The completed building – The Rookery – was revolutionary in several respects. Its architecture was unique and much more ornate than had been seen to date in commercial buildings. The Rookery successfully implemented many new and breakthrough building technologies – including metal framing, elevators, fireproofing, electrical lighting, and plate glass – that established the commercial acceptance of the modern skyscraper. At 11 stories tall, The Rookery was one of the earliest examples of metal framing with masonry walls on such a large scale. Today, it is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago.

Moorish, Romanesque Commercial, Indian, Venetian, Arabian, Islamic, Byzantine: all these words have been used to describe the Rookery’s exterior motifs. Some critics said that the mix of styles lacked unity, but others felt that the repeating patterns were an interpretation of American culture, reflecting a spirit of conquest.

The Oriel Staircase

The Oriel Staircase
Architect John Root designed an iron staircase that winds down from floor 12 to 2 and projects into the light well. The intricate, repeating patterns and the spiraling nature of the steps is both overwhelming and awe-inspiring.

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UNITY TEMPLE by mabel65

UNITY TEMPLE is a Unitarian Universalist church in Oak Park, Illinois, and the home of the Unity Temple Unitarian Universalist Congregation. It was designed by the American architect FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, who was a member, and built between 1905 and 1908. Unity Temple is considered to be one of Wright’s most important structures dating from the first decade of the twentieth century. Because of its consolidation of aesthetic intent and structure through use of a single material, reinforced concrete, Unity Temple is considered by many architects to be the first modern building in the world. This idea became of central importance to the modern architects who followed Wright, such as Mies Van Der Rohe, and even the post-modernists, such as Frank Gehry.
The building has been a United States National Historic Landmark since 1971 and was chosen in a 1991 poll in the magazine, Architectural Record as one of the 100 most significant buildings in the United States of the previous 100 years (Unity Temple was #6). Additionally, Unity Temple was chosen by the American Institute of Architects as one of 17 buildings by Frank Lloyd Wright that should be retained as his architectural contribution to American culture.

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Wright’s Light Court (II) by michaelwilhelmi

This is a second image from the 1886 Rookery building’s Light Court which was remodeled in 1905 by the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This was photographed from the exact opposite direction from the previous image. This photo shows the underside of the beginning of the building’s spiral staircase and also two of the distinctive Wright hanging lamps.

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Wright’s Light Court by michaelwilhelmi

This is an image from a Chicago building called The Rookery which was built in 1886 with an interior light court under a skylight. The light court was remodeled in 1905 by the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright and has several of his distinctive decorative features such as the lamps hanging from the skylight, the ironwork and the painted gold designs on the white walls.

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A STEP UP by mabel65

The Rookery Building is a historic landmark located in the Loop area of Chicago. Completed by John Wellborn Root and Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root in 1888, it is considered one of their masterpiece buildings, and was once the location of their office. The building measures 181 feet (55 m), is twelve stories tall and is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago. It has a unique style with exterior load-bearing walls and an interior steel frame, which provided a transition between accepted and new building techniques. The lobby was remodeled in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Beginning in 1989, the lobby was restored to the original Wright design.

Frank Lloyd Wright was a young architectural assistant working with Adler and Sullivan at the time the Rookery was built in 1886. Architect Daniel Burnham was a friend of Wright patron Edward C. Waller. Waller managed the Rookery; Wright had his offices in the building in 1898–1899. In 1905 Wright received the commission to redesign the lobby in the building; at the time considered the grandest in Chicago. Wright’s work on the Rookery recast the entryway in his Prairie style and added a sense of modernity through his simple but effective lighting design. Wright’s work on the Rookery is his only work on any building within the downtown cityscape.

Among Wright’s most significant alterations was the addition of white marble with Persian-style ornamentation. The marble and decorative details added a sense of luxury to the lobby’s steel-laden interior, marked by Burnham and Root’s skeletal metal ribbing. The entire interior space is bright and open. A double set of curving, heavily ornamented stairs wind upward from the lobby’s second floor into the building’s interior. A wrap-around balcony on the second floor enhances the feeling of being within the interior of a “clockwork.” The Wright remodel opened the building up to more of the available light.

The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on July 5, 1972, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and listed as a National Historic Landmark on May 15, 1975.

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A STEP UP by mabel65

The Rookery Building is a historic landmark located in the Loop area of Chicago. Completed by John Wellborn Root and Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root in 1888, it is considered one of their masterpiece buildings, and was once the location of their office. The building measures 181 feet (55 m), is twelve stories tall and is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago. It has a unique style with exterior load-bearing walls and an interior steel frame, which provided a transition between accepted and new building techniques. The lobby was remodeled in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Beginning in 1989, the lobby was restored to the original Wright design.

Frank Lloyd Wright was a young architectural assistant working with Adler and Sullivan at the time the Rookery was built in 1886. Architect Daniel Burnham was a friend of Wright patron Edward C. Waller. Waller managed the Rookery; Wright had his offices in the building in 1898–1899. In 1905 Wright received the commission to redesign the lobby in the building; at the time considered the grandest in Chicago. Wright’s work on the Rookery recast the entryway in his Prairie style and added a sense of modernity through his simple but effective lighting design. Wright’s work on the Rookery is his only work on any building within the downtown cityscape.

Among Wright’s most significant alterations was the addition of white marble with Persian-style ornamentation. The marble and decorative details added a sense of luxury to the lobby’s steel-laden interior, marked by Burnham and Root’s skeletal metal ribbing. The entire interior space is bright and open. A double set of curving, heavily ornamented stairs wind upward from the lobby’s second floor into the building’s interior. A wrap-around balcony on the second floor enhances the feeling of being within the interior of a “clockwork.” The Wright remodel opened the building up to more of the available light.

The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on July 5, 1972, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and listed as a National Historic Landmark on May 15, 1975.

via http://bit.ly/1Llony1

A STEP UP by mabel65

The Rookery Building is a historic landmark located in the Loop area of Chicago. Completed by John Wellborn Root and Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root in 1888, it is considered one of their masterpiece buildings, and was once the location of their office. The building measures 181 feet (55 m), is twelve stories tall and is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago. It has a unique style with exterior load-bearing walls and an interior steel frame, which provided a transition between accepted and new building techniques. The lobby was remodeled in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Beginning in 1989, the lobby was restored to the original Wright design.

Frank Lloyd Wright was a young architectural assistant working with Adler and Sullivan at the time the Rookery was built in 1886. Architect Daniel Burnham was a friend of Wright patron Edward C. Waller. Waller managed the Rookery; Wright had his offices in the building in 1898–1899. In 1905 Wright received the commission to redesign the lobby in the building; at the time considered the grandest in Chicago. Wright’s work on the Rookery recast the entryway in his Prairie style and added a sense of modernity through his simple but effective lighting design. Wright’s work on the Rookery is his only work on any building within the downtown cityscape.

Among Wright’s most significant alterations was the addition of white marble with Persian-style ornamentation. The marble and decorative details added a sense of luxury to the lobby’s steel-laden interior, marked by Burnham and Root’s skeletal metal ribbing. The entire interior space is bright and open. A double set of curving, heavily ornamented stairs wind upward from the lobby’s second floor into the building’s interior. A wrap-around balcony on the second floor enhances the feeling of being within the interior of a “clockwork.” The Wright remodel opened the building up to more of the available light.

The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on July 5, 1972, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and listed as a National Historic Landmark on May 15, 1975.

via http://bit.ly/1Llony1

A STEP UP by mabel65

The Rookery Building is a historic landmark located in the Loop area of Chicago. Completed by John Wellborn Root and Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root in 1888, it is considered one of their masterpiece buildings, and was once the location of their office. The building measures 181 feet (55 m), is twelve stories tall and is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago. It has a unique style with exterior load-bearing walls and an interior steel frame, which provided a transition between accepted and new building techniques. The lobby was remodeled in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Beginning in 1989, the lobby was restored to the original Wright design.

Frank Lloyd Wright was a young architectural assistant working with Adler and Sullivan at the time the Rookery was built in 1886. Architect Daniel Burnham was a friend of Wright patron Edward C. Waller. Waller managed the Rookery; Wright had his offices in the building in 1898–1899. In 1905 Wright received the commission to redesign the lobby in the building; at the time considered the grandest in Chicago. Wright’s work on the Rookery recast the entryway in his Prairie style and added a sense of modernity through his simple but effective lighting design. Wright’s work on the Rookery is his only work on any building within the downtown cityscape.

Among Wright’s most significant alterations was the addition of white marble with Persian-style ornamentation. The marble and decorative details added a sense of luxury to the lobby’s steel-laden interior, marked by Burnham and Root’s skeletal metal ribbing. The entire interior space is bright and open. A double set of curving, heavily ornamented stairs wind upward from the lobby’s second floor into the building’s interior. A wrap-around balcony on the second floor enhances the feeling of being within the interior of a “clockwork.” The Wright remodel opened the building up to more of the available light.

The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on July 5, 1972, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and listed as a National Historic Landmark on May 15, 1975.

via http://bit.ly/1Llony1

A STEP UP by mabel65

The Rookery Building is a historic landmark located in the Loop area of Chicago. Completed by John Wellborn Root and Daniel Burnham of Burnham and Root in 1888, it is considered one of their masterpiece buildings, and was once the location of their office. The building measures 181 feet (55 m), is twelve stories tall and is considered the oldest standing high-rise in Chicago. It has a unique style with exterior load-bearing walls and an interior steel frame, which provided a transition between accepted and new building techniques. The lobby was remodeled in 1905 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Beginning in 1989, the lobby was restored to the original Wright design.

Frank Lloyd Wright was a young architectural assistant working with Adler and Sullivan at the time the Rookery was built in 1886. Architect Daniel Burnham was a friend of Wright patron Edward C. Waller. Waller managed the Rookery; Wright had his offices in the building in 1898–1899. In 1905 Wright received the commission to redesign the lobby in the building; at the time considered the grandest in Chicago. Wright’s work on the Rookery recast the entryway in his Prairie style and added a sense of modernity through his simple but effective lighting design. Wright’s work on the Rookery is his only work on any building within the downtown cityscape.

Among Wright’s most significant alterations was the addition of white marble with Persian-style ornamentation. The marble and decorative details added a sense of luxury to the lobby’s steel-laden interior, marked by Burnham and Root’s skeletal metal ribbing. The entire interior space is bright and open. A double set of curving, heavily ornamented stairs wind upward from the lobby’s second floor into the building’s interior. A wrap-around balcony on the second floor enhances the feeling of being within the interior of a “clockwork.” The Wright remodel opened the building up to more of the available light.

The building was designated a Chicago Landmark on July 5, 1972, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 17, 1970 and listed as a National Historic Landmark on May 15, 1975.

via http://bit.ly/1Llony1