Tag Archives: ceramic

Plaza de España – Sevilla by neobit

The Plaza de España, designed by Aníbal González, was a principal building built on the Maria Luisa Park’s edge to showcase Spain’s industry and technology exhibits. González combined a mix of 1920s Art Deco and ‘mock Mudejar’, and Neo-Mudéjar styles. The Plaza de España complex is a huge half-circle with buildings continually running around the edge accessible over the moat by numerous bridges representing the four ancient kingdoms of Spain. In the centre is the Vicente Traver fountain. By the walls of the Plaza are many tiled alcoves, each representing a different province of Spain.
Today the Plaza de España mainly consists of Government buildings. The Seville Town Hall, with sensitive adaptive redesign, is located within it. The Plaza’s tiled ‘Alcoves of the Provinces’ are backdrops for visitors portrait photographs, taken in their own home province’s alcove. Towards the end of the park, the grandest mansions from the fair have been adapted as museums. The farthest contains the city’s archaeology collections. The main exhibits are Roman mosaics and artefacts from nearby Italica.

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Edificio La Adriática – Sevilla by neobit

El Edificio de La Adriática se levantó en Sevilla entre los años 1914 y 1922 en la calle Cánovas del Castillo, actual Avenida de la Constitución.
Proyectado por el arquitecto José Espiau y Muñoz, en 1914, para la importante Compañía de seguros La Adriática, constituye un bello ejemplo de arquitectura ecléctica, donde se combinan elementos de ascendencia islámica con otros de estilo plateresco y otros claramente regionalistas. El edificio se construye en pleno auge constructivo de la ciudad de Sevilla con motivo de la apertura y el ensanche de la Avenida, y próximo al gran evento de la Exposición Iberoamericana de 1929.
La particularidad de su situación sobre un solar de planta triangular con ángulo muy acusado sobre una manzana muy bien ubicada en la confluencia de la Avenida con las plazas Nueva y de San Francisco, fue aprovechada por la creatividad de su autor para diseñar un edificio único, con unas perspectivas poco comunes en la ciudad, y con unas formas en las que predomina el estilo neomudéjar, tan presente en la ciudad de Sevilla en esa época.
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Built in 1915 for the insurance company la Adriática, its namesake building is a beautiful example of neo-mudéjar architecture in Seville. Its location on a triangular piece of land where avenida de la Constitución meets calle Fernández y González gave the building its unusually thin shape and strategic location. The tip of the triangle is crowned with a dome over Islamic style windows and azulejos tiles. The building was designed by one of Seville’s most renowned neo-mudéjar architects, José Espiau y Muñoz, whose notable works include the legendary Hotel Alfonso XIII.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

The Crypt of the Church of Colonia Güell (1898-1914) Colonia Güell was a small workers’ village, which was built in 1882, next to Mr. Güell’s textile factory located near the town of Santa Coloma de Cervelló, in the Baix Llobregat region, about 20 km. from Barcelona. The Colonia occupied about 30 of the 160 hectares on the “Can Soler de la Torre” estate, which Güell’s father had acquired in 1860. The workers’ homes were spread around the factory in a regular pattern, with small two-story houses, built by Gaudí’s assistants, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellver.
Güell, the future Count, planned for all kinds of services to be available to his factory employees, including a church. Gaudí was put in charge of building it, and he enjoyed the opportunity to work on a project from the beginning, not being limited to a predefined floor plan as had been the case with the Sagrada Familia and the Col.legi Teresia.
Gaudí spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site. Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten-thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church’s structure was obtained by turning them upside-down. Gaudí took photographs from various angles so he could see vertical sections or elevations of the building.
Gaudí’s design was to be a crypt with a portico, taking advantage of the unevenness of the land, and a four-floor high chapel which would be reached via a stairway above the portico. The church, located on a small hill, would have blended with the pines because of the color scheme that Gaudí had designed: the crypt walls are built with arch bricks and black basalt, representing the earth and the tree trunks. Further up the walls, the material was intended to gradually change to green hues, like the tops of the trees, then blue, like the sky, finishing white and golden at the highest part of the bell towers, representing the clouds in the sky and the sun. At the same time, this chromatic process is a symbol of the path to Christian living, from the shadows of hell to the light of the Glory of God.
Work did not begin until late 1908, and just when the crypt was being finished and construction of the chapel walls was beginning, work was stopped because of the death of Count Güell, in 1914.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

In 1898 Eusebi Güell asked Antoni Gaudí to build a church for the textile model village he had founded on the outskirts of Barcelona in 1890. The architect proposed an ambitious project, and devoted ten years to preliminary studies during which he developed an innovative “stereostatic” model of the church. The first stone was laid in October 1908 but six years later, in October 1914, Gaudí abandoned the works, after the project became economically unviable for the Güells. The church was to have one upper and one lower nave with 40-metre high towers, but only the first part was ever built, and the project has become popularly known as “the crypt” in its honour.
Although never finished, the Güell village church is considered one of Gaudí’s masterpieces because it anticipates many of the structural solutions that the architect applied to the Sagrada Familia. The entrance porch consists of inclined columns and parabolic and hyperbolic vaults, used here for the first time in the history of architecture. This unique geometric form is repeated in the walls of the church, with a star-shaped profile pierced by large windows whose stained glass combines crosses with plant forms. Both walls and porch incorporate ornamental details in trencadis, using natural and religious motifs. In the interior, Gaudí achieved an open-plan space thanks to the use of inclined stone and brick pillars. Set over these columns, the catenary arches and ribs that support the ceiling constitute one of the most spectacular panaromas in the Gaudí universe.

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Cripta Gaudí – Colonia Güell by neobit

In 1898 Eusebi Güell asked Antoni Gaudí to build a church for the textile model village he had founded on the outskirts of Barcelona in 1890. The architect proposed an ambitious project, and devoted ten years to preliminary studies during which he developed an innovative “stereostatic” model of the church. The first stone was laid in October 1908 but six years later, in October 1914, Gaudí abandoned the works, after the project became economically unviable for the Güells. The church was to have one upper and one lower nave with 40-metre high towers, but only the first part was ever built, and the project has become popularly known as “the crypt” in its honour.
Although never finished, the Güell village church is considered one of Gaudí’s masterpieces because it anticipates many of the structural solutions that the architect applied to the Sagrada Familia. The entrance porch consists of inclined columns and parabolic and hyperbolic vaults, used here for the first time in the history of architecture. This unique geometric form is repeated in the walls of the church, with a star-shaped profile pierced by large windows whose stained glass combines crosses with plant forms. Both walls and porch incorporate ornamental details in trencadis, using natural and religious motifs. In the interior, Gaudí achieved an open-plan space thanks to the use of inclined stone and brick pillars. Set over these columns, the catenary arches and ribs that support the ceiling constitute one of the most spectacular panaromas in the Gaudí universe.

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