Tag Archives: baseball

Goodnight Giant by AaronMPhoto

I’ve always loved this location under the Bay Bridge the way that it captures the San Francisco skyline is hard to beat. The Embarcadero Center lights … the Beacon atop the Transamerica Building … Cost Tower … the bridge lights all make a pretty surreal scene.

Just to the left of this frame lies AT&T park where on this particular night the San Francisco Giants (baseball team) hunted for a World Series Game 4 victory. The entire city skyline turned itself orange for them, from the lights on top of buildings, to an orange Beacon and orange glow of Coit Tower. The Giants responded with an 11-4 victory! Even the moon made an appearance, as it set right behind the Transamerica Building.

It was super fun to meet Matt Walker for the first time, after so many conversations on Flickr, Facebook and text. Also great to shoot with Rebecca and Wilson Ng, then meet up with Jeff and Tung who were above us (and the Bay Bridge).

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8
42mm, f/18, 30 sec, ISO 400

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Holy Cow! by Meezer3

Harry Caray was an American sportscaster on radio and television. He covered four Major League Baseball teams, beginning with 25 years of calling the games of the St. Louis Cardinals. After a year working for the Oakland Athletics and eleven years with the Chicago White Sox, Caray spent the last sixteen years of his career as the announcer for the Chicago Cubs. He has won multiple Emmy Awards for baseball play-by-play and studio work for NBC Sports.This is his restaurant in downtown Chicago.
He was also well known for his frequent exclamation of “Holy Cow!” As he noted in interviews and in his autobiography Holy Cow!, he trained himself to use this expression, to avoid any chance of using profanity on the air. Caray also avoided any risk of mis-calling a home run, using what became a trademark home run call: “It might be … it could be … it IS! A home run! Holy cow!” In Holy Cow!, Caray said he first used the “It might be …” part of that expression on the air while covering a college baseball tournament in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in the early 1940s. He also said that was probably the first time he said “Holy cow!” on the air.On October 23, 1987 Harry Caray’s Italian Steakhouse opened in the Chicago Varnish Company Building, a Chicago Landmark building that is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are now six restaurants, and an off-premises catering division which bear the Harry Caray name. The original restaurant has received numerous awards for its food and service, and features many items of memorabilia, even a statue of a “Holey Cow” (complete with holes) wearing the trademark Harry Caray eyeglasses.

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