Tag Archives: atrium

Escala d’Honor – Ajuntament de Barcelona by neobit

The Staircase of Honour

This staircase leads from the ground floor vestibule to the Gothic Gallery and the “Saló de Cent”. On the way up we find the city coat of arms in stone which was originally located at the old Gate of St. Antoni. Two tapestries “of the Councillors” depict the protection provided by the “Consell de Cent” to the citycrafts such as glassmaking: and foreign trade.

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The Control Room by Turnipfarmer

Bermondsey Underground Station, London, England – http://bit.ly/1FZgNen

Another awesome station on the London Underground network and worth a visit if your like me and you enjoy a good Underground station.

I just like the way the light beams in through essentially what is a big skylight, gives Bermondsey a cavernous feel the the station and it certainly feels like that when your there.

Its a station I do intend to revisit on my next trip to London as I have a few new ideas I could try out, whether they will work or not is a different matter.

I am not sure if it was best to go with this crop with the large amount of black on the edges or do you think I should have gone for a square crop? I just couldn’t decide and felt this worked best.

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The War of the Worlds by Turnipfarmer

Kings Cross Station, London, England – http://bit.ly/1FZgNen

This is one view I have been trying to master for ages and also edit the way I want it to and this is the final edit that I am actually happy with.

Originally taken with my old A700 and the Samyang fisheye attached to it, it wasn’t the easiest of photos to line up but quite happy with the job I did.

I was quite fortunate to see this new part of the station before it opened to the general public a few years ago as I worked at Kings Cross. It was quite unusual seeing a mainline station with only a handful of people in and around it, something that will never happen now. I would have tried to get this image when I went to the special opening ceremony but sadly this was the place the host was talking from.

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Ajuntament de Barcelona by neobit

The Barcelona City Hall is perhaps one of the best known buildings in Barcelona because it is the seat of the City Government, but it is also a testimonial of life in the city, and this is possibly its lesser known aspect.
Located in an area where, since the founding of the city at the end of the first century B.C., the first Barcelonese discussed municipal matters in Latin; it was not until the 14th century that the Councillors again chose this site to build a house for their meetings and to decide in Catalan and with complete autonomy, the future of the city.
From medieval times to the present, this Institution has undergone changes and modifications that have affected the city and its citizens. Changes which have been reflected in the building itself. For this reason, the “Casa de la Ciutat” has become a brief compendium of Barcelona’s history and a museum exhibiting within its walls the works of artists of different ages.

via http://bit.ly/1NeDESn

Ajuntament de Barcelona by neobit

The Barcelona City Hall is perhaps one of the best known buildings in Barcelona because it is the seat of the City Government, but it is also a testimonial of life in our city, and this is possibly its lesser known aspect.
Located in an area where, since the founding of the city at the end of the first century B.C., the first Barcelonese discussed municipal matters in Latin; it was not until the 14th century that the Councillors again chose this site to build a house for their meetings and to decide in Catalan and with complete autonomy, the future of the city.
From medieval times to the present, this Institution has undergone changes and modifications that have affected the city and its citizens. Changes which have been reflected in the building itself. For this reason, the “Casa de la Ciutat” has become a brief compendium of Barcelona’s history and a museum exhibiting within its walls the works of artists of different ages.
This itinerary will be useful, as a guide, in order to get to know this City Hall better and to observe and discover rooms, pictures and details which are part of our common heritage.

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Casa Amatller – Patio central by neobit

This amazing building, the Casa Amatller by Puig i Cadafalch, a contemporary of Gaudí, which combines the neo-Gothic style with a ridged façade inspired by houses in the Netherlands, is part of the block known as the “mansana de la discòrdia” of Barcelona. The architect worked with some of the finest artists and craftsmen in Barcelona of the modersnista times, headed by the sculptors Eusebi Arnau and Alfons Jujol.
The Casa Amatller, together with the adjacent Casa Batlló, designed by Gaudí, and the Casa Lleó Morera, by Domènech i Montaner, is part of the “mansana de la discòrdia” or block of discord of Barcelona, so-named because it features buildings in sharply contrasting styles. Curiously, none of these houses was newly built; all three of them are refurbishments of already existing buildings, the Casa Amatller being the first. The original building was constructed by Antoni Robert in 1875, and in 1898 the Amatller family commissioned the Catalan architect and politician Josep Puig i Cadafalch (1867-1956) to refurbish the building. The current building dates from his “rose” or modernista period, which includes buildings such as the Casa Macaya and the Casa de les Punxes, the House of Spikes.
The architect based his design on the typical Catalan mansion and incorporated Germanic elements. In the case of the Casa Amatller of Barcelona, the basic layout is the typical urban Gothic dwelling. This means that what is really a block of flats looks like a single palazzo, an impression accentuated by the delicate porticoes on the balconies on the first floor. The Germanic element is the bold ridged cornice, highlighted with ceramic tiles. You can visit the caretaker’s office, which has survived intact and contains one of the finest stained-glass windows of the modernista era.

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Casa Amatller – Atrium by neobit

This amazing building, the Casa Amatller by Puig i Cadafalch, a contemporary of Gaudí, which combines the neo-Gothic style with a ridged façade inspired by houses in the Netherlands, is part of the block known as the “mansana de la discòrdia” of Barcelona. The architect worked with some of the finest artists and craftsmen in Barcelona of the modersnista times, headed by the sculptors Eusebi Arnau and Alfons Jujol.
The Casa Amatller, together with the adjacent Casa Batlló, designed by Gaudí, and the Casa Lleó Morera, by Domènech i Montaner, is part of the “mansana de la discòrdia” or block of discord of Barcelona, so-named because it features buildings in sharply contrasting styles. Curiously, none of these houses was newly built; all three of them are refurbishments of already existing buildings, the Casa Amatller being the first. The original building was constructed by Antoni Robert in 1875, and in 1898 the Amatller family commissioned the Catalan architect and politician Josep Puig i Cadafalch (1867-1956) to refurbish the building. The current building dates from his “rose” or modernista period, which includes buildings such as the Casa Macaya and the Casa de les Punxes, the House of Spikes.
The architect based his design on the typical Catalan mansion and incorporated Germanic elements. In the case of the Casa Amatller of Barcelona, the basic layout is the typical urban Gothic dwelling. This means that what is really a block of flats looks like a single palazzo, an impression accentuated by the delicate porticoes on the balconies on the first floor. The Germanic element is the bold ridged cornice, highlighted with ceramic tiles. You can visit the caretaker’s office, which has survived intact and contains one of the finest stained-glass windows of the modernista era.

via http://bit.ly/1g0naSZ