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light in end of tunnel by Elstrup

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The biggest and most important monument of Lovćen national park is Petar Petrović Njegoš’s Mausoleum. The location for his burial place and the mausoleum at the summit of Jezerski vrh was chosen by Njegoš himself as his last wish.
However, Njegoš’s express wish was to be buried in a small chapel which he had built in his lifetime. This was done, but the original chapel was destroyed when the Austro-Hungarian army invaded Montenegro in First World War (1916). Njegoš’s remains were then transferred into Cetinje Monastery and buried in the chapel rebuilt by King Alexander in 1920s. Contrary to Njegoš’s express wishes to be buried in that chapel, the then communist powers of Montenegro destroyed the chapel and built in its stead a monumental mausoleum in Viennese Secession style. The local Bishopric (Mitropolija) of the Serbian Orthodox Church opposed the destruction and even took the matter to the Constitutional Court, albeit with no success. The design was that of Ivan Meštrović who, although world-famous, had never set foot on Lovćen.
The protests erupted in 1970 with many famous Yugoslav public figures, of both Montenegrin and non-Montenegrin origin, complaining of what they described as barbaric breaking of Njegoš’s last will.
The mountain slopes are rocky, with numerous fissures, pits and deep depressions giving its scenery a specific look. Standing on the border between two completely different natural wholes, the sea and the mainland, Lovćen is under the influence of both climates. The specific connection of the life conditions has stipulated the development of the different biological systems. There are 1158 plant species on Lovćen, out of which four are endemic
Lovćen (Serbian: Lovćen, Ловћен, pronounced [lɔ̂ːʋtɕɛn]) is a mountain and national park in southwestern Montenegro.
Mount Lovćen rises from the borders of the Adriatic basin closing the long ang twisting bays of Boka Kotorska and making the hinterland to the coastal town of Kotor. The mountain has two imposing peaks, Štirovnik (1,749 m) and Jezerski vrh (1,657 m).

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Blue Skyelight by Elstrup

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Skylights in blue, an old picture from Switzerland as I again and again returning to my favorite picture indeed, and now att is I have been a little better in Photoshop – unfortunately before I not have use the RAW format at that time. Here I Examined the picture care fully and revive the hope it falls into your liking. The photo was taken in the exhibition center of Basel and the architect Herzog & de Meuron having created this architectural masterpiece one pearl and engineering combined surprise and light the light come into the passag

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The Sky’s No Limit by Elstrup

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Tivoli Hotel (or Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center) is a hotel in Copenhagen, which opened on September 2, 2010. It is owned and operated by Arp-Hansen Hotel Group. Tivoli Hotel & Congress Center was designed by Danish architect Kim Utzon, who also designed the nearby hotel WakeUp Copenhagen. The congress center is one of Copenhagen’s largest with capacity for 6,000 delegates.

Tivoli Hotel has 679 rooms in addition also fitness facilities, swimming pool, bar, restaurant and indoor and outdoor playground. It was built after the Tivoli did not get permission to build a 102 meter high hotel and apartment building next to City Hall. Tivoli Hotel is at. October 1, 2010 Member of Worldhotels.

The hotel had of just under 400 rooms but was expanded in 2015 with 282 new rooms. In total, the hotel complex incl. Wakeup Copenhagen 1210 rooms

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Skye light by Elstrup

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Bornholm Dome

BL s Dome i Allinge for alvor i gang. Domen has previously been performed til Gange in connection with folkemøderne i 2012 og 2013 i en midlertidig form mænd nu opføres Den som da permanent building with funding from Lokale og Anlægsfonden.

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The Bridge II by Elstrup

The Bridge
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The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Storebæltsforbindelsen) runs between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen. It consists of three structures: a road suspension bridge and a railway tunnel between Zealand and the small island Sprogø located in the middle of the Great Belt, and a box girder bridge for both road and rail traffic between Sprogø and Funen. The “Great Belt Bridge” (Danish: Storebæltsbroen) commonly refers to the suspension bridge, although it may also be used to mean the box-girder bridge or the link in its entirety. The suspension bridge, officially known as the East Bridge, has the world’s third longest main span (1.6 km), and the longest outside of Asia. It was designed by the Danish engineering firms COWI and Ramboll. The link replaced the ferry service that had been the primary means of crossing the Great Belt. After more than five decades of speculation and debate, the decision to construct the link was made in 1986;[2] the original intent was to complete the railway link three years before opening the road connection, but the link opened to rail traffic in 1997 and road traffic in 1998. At an estimated cost of DKK 21.4 billion (1988 prices),[3] the link is the largest construction project in Danish history.[4]
Operation and maintenance are performed by A/S Storebælt under Sund & Bælt. Construction and maintenance are financed by tolls on vehicles and trains.
The link has reduced travel times significantly; previously taking about an hour by ferry, the Great Belt can now be crossed in about ten minutes. The construction of the link and the Øresund Bridge have together enabled driving from mainland Europe to Sweden and the rest of Scandinavia through Denmark. Cyclists are not permitted to use the bridge, but cycles may be transported by train or bus.

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The Bridge by Elstrup

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The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Storebæltsforbindelsen) runs between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen. It consists of three structures: a road suspension bridge and a railway tunnel between Zealand and the small island Sprogø located in the middle of the Great Belt, and a box girder bridge for both road and rail traffic between Sprogø and Funen. The “Great Belt Bridge” (Danish: Storebæltsbroen) commonly refers to the suspension bridge, although it may also be used to mean the box-girder bridge or the link in its entirety. The suspension bridge, officially known as the East Bridge, has the world’s third longest main span (1.6 km), and the longest outside of Asia. It was designed by the Danish engineering firms COWI and Ramboll. The link replaced the ferry service that had been the primary means of crossing the Great Belt. After more than five decades of speculation and debate, the decision to construct the link was made in 1986;[2] the original intent was to complete the railway link three years before opening the road connection, but the link opened to rail traffic in 1997 and road traffic in 1998. At an estimated cost of DKK 21.4 billion (1988 prices),[3] the link is the largest construction project in Danish history.[4]

Operation and maintenance are performed by A/S Storebælt under Sund & Bælt. Construction and maintenance are financed by tolls on vehicles and trains.

The link has reduced travel times significantly; previously taking about an hour by ferry, the Great Belt can now be crossed in about ten minutes. The construction of the link and the Øresund Bridge have together enabled driving from mainland Europe to Sweden and the rest of Scandinavia through Denmark. Cyclists are not permitted to use the bridge, but cycles may be transported by train or bus.

via http://bit.ly/1KEmDUT

Pink Floyd Power Station.That’s what a dark Satani by Elstrup

Power Station – Pink Floyd
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Copenhagen Power plant one karastisk property impressively powerful enjoy

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414X6065.JPG by Elstrup

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INGVAR CRONHAMMAR
The old water reservoir at Søndermarken Park was drained 33 years ago.
Throughout 2015 you can experience the water return to the Cisterns, a 4.320 square meter underground space.

The exhibition “H” is an ambitious and comprehensive installation created by the Danish artist Ingvar Cronhammar, accompanied by the Danish musical composer Martin Hall.

When entering the Cisterns you will be surrounded by water, in the form of a large water surface that covers the floors, and columns of falling water that reflect and co-create the visual as well as the musical experience.

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